Okay, I finally had time to find a picture resizer and now you can see Sunshine and her glorious blanket. In the blanket you can find: two butterflies, flowers in a basket, flowers dancing in a line, a Siamese cat, a tiger, a loopy-furred sheep, a pig, 3 fish swimming over a snail shell, a star, a yellow edged red heart (which I call the Sunshine heart), a soft pink plushie yarn heart (the Noona heart), a yellow flower that stands proud of the blanket by about an inch or so (Sunshine really liked that one), a doggie that just happens to look like her June Bug puppy, and various other squares.

BTW, as of the time of this posting being created, the likes/loves/wows are almost to 850. 8:30 a.m. central, the likes/loves/wows are over 900. And that’s not counting the separate hits on the photos.

G’head. Revel in the wonderment.

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63 thoughts on “

  1. #5

    When I’m gone and they’re combing through my “digital footprint”, my wife is going to be scratching her head.

    Maybe I should ‘splain now. … nah.

  2. A family heirloom has emerged right before our very eyes. And a new internet star is born. Has Megyn invited you to the Today show yet? Book deal, coffee cups – here comes the fame. That is really a special piece.

  3. That’s pretty drunk.

    CASPER, Wyo. — Police say a central Wyoming man they arrested for public intoxication claimed he had traveled back in time to warn of an alien invasion.

    Casper police say the man they encountered at 10:30 p.m. Monday claimed he was from the year 2048.

    KTWO-AM in Casper reports that the man told police that he wanted to warn the people of Casper that aliens will arrive next year, and that they should leave as soon as possible. He asked to speak to the president of the town, about 170 miles northwest of Cheyenne.

    The man told police he was only able to time travel because aliens filled his body with alcohol. He noted that he was supposed to be transported to the year 2018, not this year.

  4. About the O.C. picture, I’m glad that you included the second one, it gave me a size reference. Looking at the first one with the Blankie on what looks like bricks, I’d have guessed that it was slightly larger than a kitchen table, place mat. Also he second one has the Awww, factor to it. 😉

  5. Good morning Hamsters. Gorgeous full moon said howdy before sunup on my way to the barn and out to fetch the paper. A hint of fall is in the air again, and there’s another promise of a real cold front for early next week.

    Ragweed pollen is off scale out here and bothering us and the horses who have their faces in it all day in the pastures. A nice northerly wind to blow it out into the Gulf would be welcome.

    Tedtam’s Masterpiece above is awesome. So is Sunshine’s reaction. A great combination to be savored in later and later years. 🙂

  6. OK, I’ve finally come to the conclusion that Tedtam is a proud gramma.

    That blanket is absolutely beautiful.

  7. #17 Katfish

    I’ve always wondered how one can be gruntled OR re-gruntled?

    YEARS AGO, I joined a software of the month club. One of the items was a game called GRUNTZ, which was a logic game. The story line for the game was that the Gruntz kicked out some of their members, who then became the Disgruntled. The player had to get their Gruntz through various levels of logic mazes without being attacked by the Disgruntled. It was really cute, with fun sayings being yelled at the player as the Gruntz were moved around the board and overcoming various obstacles. LD got pretty good at the game.

    I laughed every time because I could hear the game talking to her.

    Found a link to download it here: http://www.old-games.com/download/3635/gruntz

  8. What does one use to gruntle another person anyway?
    A gruntler? Gruntulator?
    Is the process called gruntulation or gruntification?
    A Pandora’s box has been opened.

  9. Personally, I’d rather someone would gast my flabber.

    Prolly cost more than twenny bux these days. . . .

  10. Sarge – did you just send me an email? It looks fishy and I’m not opening it unless you verify you sent it.

    Otherwise – you been hacked!

  11. According to Rush, it’s a disgronificator. A disgronificator may also be an electronic device which can fail on demand should the need arise, like when you are arguing with someone on the phone or talking to a bill collector or process server.

  12. #27 Bone

    I saw that video and my blood pressure went through the roof. She is a moron of incredible degree, boorish to boot, and I hope she learns a lesson from all of this.

    Taking someone’s property is one thing. She also taunted him with it, and accused him of supporting genocide. (Because we all know that Trump is the equivalent of Pol Pot, Hitler, and Stalin in killing people he doesn’t like…or is that Hillary and Bill I’m thinking of?) He showed considerable restraint in not punching her face.

    I’m glad the real victim is taking a stand. These bullies need to be taught some manners. Disagreement does not equal wissholedom.

  13. ALL OF THE RIOTERS and other terrorists need to be treated with extreme prejudice. Having a peaceful demonstration is a noble thing – infringing on others rights to peacefully and safely be about their own business (that includes blocking roadways) is another thing entirely. Heckling and shouting down an invited speaker because you do not agree with his views is borderline criminal.

  14. Heckling and shouting down an invited speaker because you do not agree with his views is borderline criminal.

    Ann Coulter has taken a pie or two in the face, no charges. That’s assault.

    Bullies will continue to bully until they are met with an opposing force.

  15. Bullies will continue to bully until they are met with an opposing force.

    In order to effectively combat the bully and others of his ilk, the opposing force needs to be an order of magnitude greater than the initial offence. There must be extreme physical pain and financial penalty or this garbage will continue.

  16. Limbaugh has been eviscerating the left/Demonazis with thier slavish devotion to Plannned Parenthood and thier culture of murdering innocent babies. This is juxtaposed against the Ds trying to blame the NRA and Rs support for same for the murder in Las Vegas.
    The NRA does not advocate violence against anyone while PP openly advocates for the murder of innocent babies.

  17. This is frightening – elderly being robbed and it’s legal. It’s a long article, but it has convinced me to never move to Nevada. I wonder how many other states have these laws?

    Rudy chatted with the nurse in the kitchen for twenty minutes, joking about marriage and laundry, until there was a knock at the door. A stocky woman with shiny black hair introduced herself as April Parks, the owner of the company A Private Professional Guardian. She was accompanied by three colleagues, who didn’t give their names. Parks told the Norths that she had an order from the Clark County Family Court to “remove” them from their home. She would be taking them to an assisted-living facility. “Go and gather your things,” she said.

    Rennie began crying. “This is my home,” she said.

    After the Norths left, Parks walked through the house with Cindy Breck, the owner of Caring Transitions, a company that relocates seniors and sells their belongings at estate sales. Breck and Parks had a routine. “We open drawers,” Parks said at a deposition. “We look in closets. We pull out boxes, anything that would store—that would keep paperwork, would keep valuables.” She took a pocket watch, birth certificates, insurance policies, and several collectible coins.

    …Parks, who had a brisk, girlish way of speaking, told Belshe that her parents had been taken to Lakeview Terrace, an assisted-living facility in Boulder City, nine miles from the Arizona border. She assured Belshe that the staff there would take care of all their needs.

    “You can’t just walk into somebody’s home and take them!” Belshe told her.

    Parks responded calmly, “It’s legal. It’s legal.”

    Guardianship derives from the state’s parens patriae power, its duty to act as a parent for those considered too vulnerable to care for themselves. “The King shall have the custody of the lands of natural fools, taking the profits of them without waste or destruction, and shall find them their necessaries,” reads the English statute De Prerogative Regis, from 1324. The law was imported to the colonies—guardianship is still controlled by state, not federal, law—and has remained largely intact for the past eight hundred years. It establishes a relationship between ward and guardian that is rooted in trust.

    In the United States, a million and a half adults are under the care of guardians, either family members or professionals, who control some two hundred and seventy-three billion dollars in assets, according to an auditor for the guardianship fraud program in Palm Beach County. Little is known about the outcome of these arrangements, because states do not keep complete figures on guardianship cases—statutes vary widely—and, in most jurisdictions, the court records are sealed. A Government Accountability report from 2010 said, “We could not locate a single Web site, federal agency, state or local entity, or any other organization that compiles comprehensive information on this issue.” A study published this year by the American Bar Association found that “an unknown number of adults languish under guardianship” when they no longer need it, or never did. The authors wrote that “guardianship is generally “permanent, leaving no way out—‘until death do us part.’ ”

    In Nevada, as in many states, anyone can become a guardian by taking a course, as long as he or she has not been convicted of a felony or recently declared bankruptcy. Elizabeth Brickfield, a Las Vegas lawyer who has worked in guardianship law for twenty years, said that about fifteen years ago, as the state’s elderly population swelled, “all these private guardians started arriving, and the docket exploded. The court became a factory.”

    Rudy had assured Belshe that he would protest the guardianship, but, like most wards in the country, Rudy and Rennie were not represented by counsel. As Rudy stood before the commissioner, he convinced himself that guardianship offered him and Rennie a lifetime of care without being a burden to anyone they loved. He told Norheim, “The issue really is her longevity—what suits her.” Belshe, who sat in the courtroom, said, “I was shaking my head. No, no, no—don’t do that!” Rennie was silent.

    Norheim ordered that the Norths become permanent wards of the court. “Chances are, I’ll probably never see you folks again; you’ll work everything out,” he said, laughing. “I very rarely see people after the initial time in court.” The hearing lasted ten minutes.

    The following month, Even Tide Life Transitions, a company that Parks often hired, sold most of the Norths’ belongings. “The general condition of this inventory is good,” an appraiser wrote. Two lithographs by Renoir were priced at thirty-eight hundred dollars, and a glass cocktail table (“Client states that it is a Brancusi design”) was twelve hundred and fifty dollars. The Norths also had several pastel drawings by their son, Randy, who died in a motorcycle accident at the age of thirty-two, as well as Kachina dolls, a Bose radio, a Dyson vacuum cleaner, a Peruvian tapestry, a motion-step exerciser, a LeRoy Neiman sketch of a bar in Dublin, and two dozen pairs of Clarke shoes. According to Parks’s calculations, the Norths had roughly fifty thousand dollars. Parks transferred their savings, held at the Bank of America, to an account in her name.

    Rennie repeatedly asked for her son’s drawings, and for the family photographs on her refrigerator. Rudy pined for his car, a midnight-blue 2010 Chrysler, which came to symbolize the life he had lost. He missed the routine interactions that driving had allowed him. “Everybody at the pharmacy was my buddy,” he said. Now he and Rennie felt like exiles. Rudy said, “They kept telling me, ‘Oh, you don’t have to worry: your car is fine, and this and that.’ ” A month later, he said, “they finally told me, ‘Actually, we sold your car.’ I said, ‘What in the hell did you sell it for?’ ” It was bought for less than eight thousand dollars, a price that Rudy considered insulting.

    At a hearing, when Amy complained to Norheim that Parks didn’t have time for her father, he replied, “Yeah, she’s an industry at this point.”

    As Belshe spoke to more wards and their families, she began to realize that Lakeview Terrace was not the only place where wards were lodged, and that Parks was not the only guardian removing people from their homes for what appeared to be superficial reasons. Hundreds of cases followed the same pattern. It had become routine for guardians in Clark County to petition for temporary guardianship on an ex-parte basis. They told the court that they had to intervene immediately because the ward faced a medical emergency that was only vaguely described: he or she was demented or disoriented, and at risk of exploitation or abuse. The guardians attached a brief physician’s certificate that contained minimal details and often stated that the ward was too incapacitated to attend a court hearing. Debra Bookout, an attorney at the Legal Aid Center of Southern Nevada, told me, “When a hospital or rehab facility needs to free up a bed, or when the patient is not paying his bills, some doctors get sloppy, and they will sign anything.” A recent study conducted by Hunter College found that a quarter of guardianship petitions in New York were brought by nursing homes and hospitals, sometimes as a means of collecting on overdue bills.

    It often took several days for relatives to realize what had happened. When they tried to contest the guardianship or become guardians themselves, they were dismissed as unsuitable, and disparaged in court records as being neglectful, or as drug addicts, gamblers, and exploiters. (Belshe was described by Parks as a “reported addict” who “has no contact with the proposed ward,” an allegation that Belshe didn’t see until it was too late to challenge.) Family who lived out of state were disqualified from serving as guardians, because the law prohibited the appointment of anyone who didn’t live in Nevada.

    Once the court approved the guardianship, the wards were often removed from their homes, which were eventually sold. Terry Williams, whose father’s estate was taken over by strangers even though he’d named her the executor of his will, has spent years combing through guardianship, probate, and real-estate records in Clark County. “I kept researching, because I was so fascinated that these people could literally take over the lives and assets of people under color of law, in less than ten minutes, and nobody was asking questions,” she told me. “These people spent their lives accumulating wealth and, in a blink of an eye, it was someone else’s.”

    Williams has reviewed hundreds of cases involving Jared Shafer, who is considered the godfather of guardians in Nevada. In the records room of the courthouse, she was afraid to say Shafer’s name out loud. In the course of his thirty-five-year career, Shafer has assumed control of more than three thousand wards and estates and trained a generation of guardians. In 1979, he became the county’s public administrator, handling the estates of people who had no relatives in Nevada, as well as the public guardian, serving wards when no family members or private guardians were available. In 2003, he left government and founded his own private guardianship and fiduciary business; he transferred the number of his government-issued phone to himself.

    Williams took records from Shafer’s and other guardians’ cases to the Las Vegas police department several times. She tried to explain, she said, that “this is a racketeering operation that is fee-based. There’s no brown paper bag handed off in an alley. The payoff is the right to bill the estate.” The department repeatedly told her that it was a civil issue, and refused to take a report. In 2006, she submitted a typed statement, listing twenty-three statutes that she thought had been violated, but an officer wrote in the top right corner, “NOT A POLICE MATTER.” Adam Woodrum, an estate lawyer in Las Vegas, told me that he’s worked with several wards and their families who have brought their complaints to the police. “They can’t even get their foot in the door,” he said.

    Acting as her own attorney, Williams filed a racketeering suit in federal court against Shafer and the lawyers who represented him. At a hearing before the United States District Court of Central California in 2009, she told the judge, “They are trumping up ways and means to deem people incompetent and take their assets.” The case was dismissed. “The scheme is ingenious,” she told me. “How do you come up with a crime that literally none of the victims can articulate without sounding like they’re nuts? The same insane allegations keep surfacing from people who don’t know each other.”

    When Concetta Mormon, a wealthy woman who owned a Montessori school, became Shafer’s ward because she had aphasia, Shafer sold the school midyear, even though students were enrolled. At a hearing after the sale, Mormon’s daughter, Victoria Cloutier, constantly spoke out of turn. The judge, Robert Lueck, ordered that she be handcuffed and placed in a holding cell while the hearing continued. Two hours later, when Cloutier was allowed to return for the conclusion, the judge told her that she had thirty days in which to vacate her mother’s house. If she didn’t leave, she would be evicted and her belongings would be taken to Goodwill.

    At the end of 2014, Lakeview Terrace hired a new director, Julie Liebo, who resisted Parks’s orders that medical information about wards be kept from their families. Liebo told me, “The families were devastated that they couldn’t know if the residents were in surgery or hear anything about their health. They didn’t understand why they’d been taken out of the picture. They’d ask, ‘Can you just tell me if she’s alive?’ ” Liebo tried to comply with the rules, because she didn’t want to violate medical-privacy laws; as guardian, Parks was entitled to choose what was disclosed. Once, though, Liebo took pity on the sister of an eighty-year-old ward named Dorothy Smith, who was mourning a dog that Parks had given away, and told her that Smith was stable. Liebo said that Parks, who was by then the secretary of the Nevada Guardianship Association, called her immediately. “She threatened my license and said she could have me arrested,” Liebo told me.

    After Liebo arrived, Parks began removing wards from Lakeview Terrace with less than a day’s notice. A woman named Linda Phillips, who had dementia, was told that she was going to the beauty salon. She never returned. Marlene Homer, the ward whose ailments were depression and “strange thoughts,” was taken away in a van, screaming. Liebo had asked the state ombudsman to come to the facility and stop the removals, but nothing could be done. “We stood there completely helpless,” Liebo said. “We had no idea where they were going.” Liebo said that other wards asked her if they would be next.

    Liebo alerted the compliance officer for the Clark County Family Court that Parks was removing residents “without any concern for them and their choice to stay here.” She also reported her complaints to the police, the Department of Health Services, the Bureau of Health Care, and Nevada Adult Protective Services. She said each agency told her that it didn’t have the authority or the jurisdiction to intervene.

  18. #36 TT: I got started on that article a couple of days ago and it caused my BP to elevate. It is precisely that kind of garbage that cause people to get killt to death. This is an ongoing case of elder abuse and grand theft by the friggen do-gooder government.

  19. I read near the bottom of the article that this crap goes on in San Antonio, so I guess Texas has similar guardianship laws.

    Damn scary. You’d think there’d be some kind of due process with the backstop of more than one judge or doctor involved…but then there’s more than one crooked judge and doctor to be found just about anywhere.

  20. grunt (grŭnt)
    v. grunt·ed, grunt·ing, grunts
    v.intr.
    1. To utter a deep guttural sound, as a hog does.
    2. To utter a sound similar to a grunt, as in disgust.

    That’s from Free Online Dictionary

    gruntle (v.)
    1938, in gruntled “pleased, satisfied,” a back-formation from disgruntled. The original verb (early 15c.) meant “to utter a little or low grunt,” hence “to murmur, complain” (1580s), but was rare or dialectal by 19c

    http://etymonline.com/index.php?term=gruntle&allowed_in_frame=0

    So a gruntled person is happy whereas a disgruntled is upset. Disgruntled people “grunt” like animals are known to do when they are upset.

    Als from FOD:

    dis·grun·tle (dĭs-grŭn′tl)
    tr.v. dis·grun·tled, dis·grun·tling, dis·grun·tles
    To make discontented.

    Therefore we can say:

    I am disgruntled
    That is disgruntling
    He disgruntles

  21. In better news, those poindexters over at Rice have apparently figured out how to make L-ion batteries take a charge extremely rapidly.

    Even better is that the batteries are made more rugged in general via this method.

    Better yet is the capacity of the batteries is virtually unchanged.

    Better still, the method uses a substance that is a byproduct of carbon sequestration and is extremely inexpensive to produce.

    “The capacity of these batteries is enormous, but what is equally remarkable is that we can bring them from zero charge to full charge in five minutes, rather than the typical two hours or more needed with other batteries,” Tour said.

    The Tour lab previously used a derivative of asphalt — specifically, untreated gilsonite, the same type used for the battery — to capture greenhouse gases from natural gas. This time, the researchers mixed asphalt with conductive graphene nanoribbons and coated the composite with lithium metal through electrochemical deposition.

  22. A number of you guys posting here have had military training and/or a ling time interest in and experience with firearms. So, maybe you can answer some questions I have about the Las Vegas shooting.

    1. Apparently the shooter, lacking any full automatic weapons used rifles with “bump stocks” to provide rapid firing. How does a bump stock affect accuracy?

    2. The concert venue was 300 – 400 yards from the shooter’s window. But none of the weapons I saw in the pictures appeared to have scopes. Can you actually consistently hit a target at 400 yards with simple iron sights?

    3. Apparently everybody is currently assuming that the shooter was simply “spraying” the crowd without regard to who he hit. But, many of the victims have multiple wounds, many in localized areas like the head or chest. This doesn’t sound reasonable to me, but perhaps I’m looking at it incorrectly.

    4. There were approximately 600 people hit with gunfire, many of them multiple times. If we assume that there were 800 rounds that actually hit targets, how many went astray? Statistics I’ve seen indicate that spraying with an automatic weapon usually yields very low percentages of actual hits, often times less than 10%. If we use this for a figure then that means the shooter fired in excess of 7000 rounds of ammunition. Assuming a weight of .8 oz/round that gives us a figure of 350 pounds of ammo expended. And we have an average rate of fire of 100 rounds per minute for 70 minutes. Does that seem feasible for a single person?

    5. Even if the shooter was perfect he would have used 600 rounds of ammo, yet the pictures I saw didn’t seem to show much in the way of empty brass on the floor. Given that the shooter killed himself and wouldn’t have policed his brass, where did it go?

    I don’t have any answers to these questions, and I’m not trying to be snarky at all, It just doesn’t seem to make sense to me. Something’s not adding up.

  23. #44 – I’m probably one of the least qualified people on this blog to respond to some of your questions, so I’ll go first. The bump stock is not conducive to a accurate shooting weapon, nor is any other auto weapon very accurate, at least once you start an extended stream. The objective is to get more lead in the air, not to be a precisions shooter. The venue reportedly had about 22,000 people who were somewhat boxed in, so once again, he was not required to be a precision shooter. About all he had to do was put it in the pen and/or hit the ground. Aim is adjusted as you see dust kicking up where you are hitting – it’s almost like shooting from the hip without aiming. No precision required. Multiple wounds, again the result of rapid fire, who know for sure. No reports on the number of rounds fired, but assume 50 rounds per magazine (some call the clips), 10 clips for 500 shots. Say roughly 10 rounds per second, probably somewhat slower than that, and a clip is emptied in a few seconds. My guess would be that the weapon would be too hot to handle easily, so most likely more than one weapon involved. Reports seem to indicate that the time actually spend firing was between 10 and 15 minutes, the rest of that 70+ minutes was spend evacuating rooms, planning breach, etc. I suspect that there is a lot about this deal that we will never know. The sheriff is apparently running for higher office, so he will be attempting to polish his image, the local politicians have got to be wetting their pants considering the potential loss of tourist revenue if they don’t do things “right,” the Dems as expected want to find a way to promote their stand by issue of gun control, and so on. Lots to be learned yet, so I would not put much stock in anything put out by the press so far. If they can find out that this guy once stayed in a Trump casino you can bet impeachment will not be far behind for this obvious case of aiding and abetting.

  24. 1. Apparently the shooter, lacking any full automatic weapons used rifles with “bump stocks” to provide rapid firing. How does a bump stock affect accuracy?

    Accuracy sucks.

    2. The concert venue was 300 – 400 yards from the shooter’s window. But none of the weapons I saw in the pictures appeared to have scopes. Can you actually consistently hit a target at 400 yards with simple iron sights?

    If the target is a couple acres with 12,000 people standing shoulder to shoulder, yes you can hit it. Fully automatic weapons are not precision weapons (normally—we get into the weeds if we talk about some specialized stuff), they are “area weapons” and are used with the intention of spreading bullets into what is called a “beaten zone”. If that beaten zone is filled with people, the people in it get hurt.

    3. Apparently everybody is currently assuming that the shooter was simply “spraying” the crowd without regard to who he hit. But, many of the victims have multiple wounds, many in localized areas like the head or chest. This doesn’t sound reasonable to me, but perhaps I’m looking at it incorrectly.

    As noted above, he was using his full auto weapon to fire on an area target full of people. The victims were on the ground. The shooter was on the 32nd floor of a hotel a couple hundred yards away. Wounds to the head and shoulders are to be expected—the same way you’d expect the top of the fish to be what gets hit when you shoot them in a barrel. It would only be hinky if the majority of wounds were in the lower extremities.

    4. There were approximately 600 people hit with gunfire, many of them multiple times. If we assume that there were 800 rounds that actually hit targets, how many went astray? Statistics I’ve seen indicate that spraying with an automatic weapon usually yields very low percentages of actual hits, often times less than 10%. If we use this for a figure then that means the shooter fired in excess of 7000 rounds of ammunition. Assuming a weight of .8 oz/round that gives us a figure of 350 pounds of ammo expended. And we have an average rate of fire of 100 rounds per minute for 70 minutes. Does that seem feasible for a single person?

    We don’t have an accurate count for how many were hit by gunfire, all we have is a total. We would not only have injuries from direct gunfire, but those from ricochets and fragments, but I think we’ll find that the bulk of the non-fatal injuries were sustained as a result of a panicked stampede for the gates.

    The normal cyclic rate for a full auto M4/M16 can achieve 900 RPM, although the gas tube would likely melt if fired at that rate for too long, the bumpfire stock probably about half that. The magazines that are sold with the bumpfire stocks are 50 & 100 round capacity, and there are drum magazines that will give you a 500 round capacity, although I’ve not seen any reports that he had any. They are also fairly unreliable.

    5. Even if the shooter was perfect he would have used 600 rounds of ammo, yet the pictures I saw didn’t seem to show much in the way of empty brass on the floor. Given that the shooter killed himself and wouldn’t have policed his brass, where did it go?

    Police reports say that brass littered the floor of the hotel room, and that he expended many more than 600 rounds.

    If he fired for 70 minutes with a cyclic rate of close to that of an M4/M16 and he switched weapons to let the barrel cool down after each 100 round magazine, you have a potential of up to 42,000 rounds being fired. Even if all of the casualties were inflicted with gunfire, and none of those caused by one bullet passing through a victim into another, that accounts for about one casualty for every 70 rounds fired. We don’t actually know yet how many rounds he did fire, but I don’t think there’s anything hinky going on here.

  25. #44 1) Anytime you fire rapidly, bump stock or not, accuracy suffers. But with any rapidly firing weapon IE, machine gun, the idea is to lay down as much lead as possible in the general area, 1 hit to 10-20 rounds is acceptable and easy, if there are large groups of people together.
    2) Shooting 400 yards downhill, at a large group of people, into basically a bull pen, is duck soup, shooting fish in a barrel, just point into the center and fire away.
    3) Multiple hits would occur if he was firing fast enough to put 6 or 8 rounds in the same spot in a few seconds.
    4) This one is tricky, you make good points, and I don’t know the answer, but he did have a captive audience, no pun intended, so his hit ratio would most likely be higher.
    5) I don’t know, out the window? I don’t have an AR, but I know three people that have them and they are all made by different manufactures, and every one of them throws the rounds forward and slightly to the left! Hard to believe since they eject from the right side of the weapon. But since lefty shooters were getting tired of hot brass going down their shirts, some smart guy invented a deflection device that throws the shell casing forward and to the left.

  26. My #47, several years ago, my buddy Gene V took his high dollar AR to the range and put a 5 gallon bucket about 8 feet in front of the bench and slightly to the left. I asked him why? And he said to catch the brass for reloading. I of course, didn’t believe him but every one of those 200 rounds except for 3 dropped into that bucket!

  27. If he fired for 70 minutes with a cyclic rate of close to that of an M4/M16 and he switched weapons to let the barrel cool down after each 100 round magazine, you have a potential of up to 42,000 rounds being fired.

    This is why there are reports of multiple shooters and multiple weapons. He was not only switching weapons to allow the barrel to cool between magazine changes, he was firing out of two different windows. That alone would cause the difference in sound being recorded by cell phones.

  28. #44 fat albert

    Yours seem to me to be excellent questions.

    Would there not be mounds of casings for that many shots having been fired? Or at least thickly spread in the area?

    This bump stock item seems to have taken off into intergalactic space in the press and elsewhere, without comprehension of that the thing actually is/does. Hannity gave a straightforward description of it this afternoon that even I could understand. He said the hoo-rah over such items make it sound exotic, whereas one can be made at home without too much effort if you know what you’re doing with firearms.

    It works by forcing the trigger against the trigger finger rather than conventionally the trigger finger pushing against the trigger, thereby reducing the interval between shots fired. It increases the cadence of shots. But this addition does not make the firearm an automatic firearm. As an aside he and a guest said the idea of banning the commercially produced ones would have no effect on a situation like this and is a total waste of time. That’s all I know about it.

  29. Since when did the the investigators increase the ‘time of firing’ from 9-10 minutes (yesterday) to 70 minutes?

  30. My understanding is time of firing is 9-10 minutes, The remainder of the time SWAT was setting up and then the actual entry in the room. No shooting after the 9, 10, 11 minute mark.

  31. The Murdoch crew at FoxNews made a very wise decision to let “the bleeder” go.

    HEADLINE: EXCLUSIVE: NBC’s ‘$69 MILLION mistake!’ Network executives slam the floundering Megyn Kelly as they reveal she is making $23M yearly in a three-year deal for her morning show – rivaling salaries of Matt Lauer and Jimmy Fallon

    Does anyone believe that after 3 years and $69MILLION that Me-Again will still be employed by NBC? She will laugh all the way to the bank and live on easy street the rest of her life.

  32. I’ll go out on a limb here and say that, if he’d have fired in semi-auto mode, quickly, but aiming every time, he may have killed more. The people were trapped in a small area and had to run over each other to get to safety and he had lots of time. Imagine a group of folks piling on top of each other to get out and all he had to do was fire into the group.
    One more thing, @ 400 yards, firing down at a 30 degree angle, hitting a man sized target is not that hard, if you aim, you could have a 50% hit rate.

  33. Oh and my #8, I just noticed that in the picture, you can see the Mercury Rocket that sits next to the big Saturn V near the entrance of the site. It is something to see the Mercury launch vehicle standing upright (full scale) next to the gigantic Saturn V. It is hard to believe that anyone would sit on top of that tiny roman candle and be blasted into low earth orbit.

  34. Attention K Mart Shoppers!! “AVERY GARDINER” with the Brady Camp is a DAMN LIAR!!! And no, like you, I’ve never heard of her before tonight,……THAT IS ALL,…Y’all can go back to your Rat Killin’

  35. I’ve found an interesting show on my ABC app, watching it on Roku.

    “Perception” features a neurology specialist who teaches at a university and consults with the FBI while experiencing hallucinations as part of of *his* mental illness. Paranoid schizophrenia, I believe. He is brilliant, so the university makes sure he has an aide to assist him, but part of the fun is him or me trying to figure out who is real and who is fake. Most of the time it’s obvious, but every now and then…

    He is a bit of a conspiracy theorist, which adds to his persona as well.

  36. Waiting at the Manchester airport fixing to head home after a week in the UK. The British are nice enough people but they haven’t got the whole “customer service” thing down. I think I offended a waitress by saying “yes ma’am”. I apologized and tried to explain it was a Southern thing. I don’t think she understood. The lyrics “You’re from down South, and when you open your mouth ….” kept rolling through my mind.

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