Monday Sloganeering Open Comments

Poor Barack. His campaign is trying to recapture the magic of 2008. Right now he’s a brand in search of a slogan. They’ve road-tested a few, but are not very happy with them:

  • Winning the Future
  • We Can’t Wait
  • An America Built to Last
  • An Economy Built to Last
  • A Fair Shot

Mickey Kaus at the Daily Caller is having a contest of sorts to help him along (his suggestion: “We Can Do Better” – if only to keep Romney from using it). We should do the same.

h/t: Instapundit

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179 thoughts on “Monday Sloganeering Open Comments

  1. Heh

    1884 James Blaine presidential campaign slogan:

    Ma, Ma, Where’s my Pa, Gone to the White House, Ha, Ha, Ha

  2. Campaigns have just gotten too coarse

    1884 Grover Cleveland

    Blaine, Blaine, James G. Blaine, The Continental Liar from the State of Maine

  3. Al Gore, Al Qaeda, Al Sharpton, Al Awlaki, Al Franken, Al Zawari , Al Grayson……Al Jazeera………Hey, there’s a pattern here.

  4. The Chronicle reviewed public records for all Texas counties and found evidence of surplus registered voters in rural Texas counties scattered statewide, including East Texas counties like Chambers, Trinity, and Polk, as well as border counties like Presidio in Big Bend country and Maverick County surrounding the border at Eagle Pass.

    The Chron doing their own research. What a novel concept.

  5. From the Monday Miscellany files………………

    Is It Time Yet To Recognize That China Is NOT Our Friend?

    This is supposed to be some sort of revelation?

    Folks, for all intents and purposes all of the hacking attack attempts that have been launched at my infrastructure, and that of people who I do network security work for, have come from China for the last decade.

    The problem started in the 1990s but in the last decade it has gotten ridiculously bad. Any sort of intellectual property is routinely stolen by the Chinese; they have zero respect for intellectual property laws and protection. If they get their paws on it they take it and they’re extremely aggressive about attempting to get their paws on it. High-intensity hacking attempts, many of which are long-running automated dictionary attacks against ssh (used to sign into Unix machines) are utterly commonplace and are often traceable directly to Chinese universities — which incidentally are basically all run by the government.

    Then there are entire companies that are basically stolen. Fellowes anyone?

    This problem is not limited to China but they’re certainly one of the most-aggressive in this regard. All of it, however, must be stopped here and now.

    If you sleep with hookers you will wake up with crabs — or worse.

    We must enforce the law and the only peaceful means available to us to do so is severe and immediate trade sanction, and when it comes to our university system the door must be slammed shut on these jackasses’ fingers — right now.

  6. “It was George Bush’s fault!”

    “Don’t change horses in midstream, even if it’s dead.”

    “Vote for me, if you know what’s good for you.”

    “We don’t need no stinkin’ elections.”

    “Vote for me to prove you’re not racist. Oh, wait, that was LAST election…”

    “Republicans want to starve families and kill Grandma – if we don’t get there first.”

    “Democrats – the cereal crowd.” (Nuts, fruits, and flakes)

    “Vote Democrat – because you can’t handle what we’re life’s giving you.”

  7. I took a bacon grease splatter almost in the eyeball yesterday. Fortunately, I blinked just in time, but the grease burn on my eyelid is itching like crazy today. It’s right near the nose, on the lid itself. Arrrrgggghhh!

  8. G’Morning All

    I promise that I will do something.

    If I can’t, I’ll blame and If it gets done, I’ll take credit.

    I promise that I will take what I don’t have and give it to you.

    Everyone will be promised a good life through lots of taxation.

    I had a wealthy neighbor that never gave me anything. I’m going to change people like that.

    I can tackle insurmountable problems through spending, taxation, and redistribution.

  9. Happy birthday Astrodome, you’ve lived a good life.

    Astros meet Yankees to inaugurate domed stadium
    April 09, 1965

    On this day in 1965, the Houston Astros played the New York Yankees in exhibition baseball in the Astrodome, the first event in the new domed stadium. The Astrodome, the first fully air-conditioned, enclosed, multipurpose sports stadium in the world, was first approved by voters in 1958.

  10. Think maybe it was slightly overloaded?

    Coast Guard: 10 pulled from water after boat capsizes off coast of Miami

    By Diana Moskovitz
    dmoskovitz@MiamiHerald.com

    Ten people were pulled from the water off the coast of Miami this weekend after the boat they were in capsized, according to the U.S. Coast Guard.

    The Coast Guard said it got a report a few minutes before 8 p.m. Saturday that 10 people were in the water and clinging to 14-foot pleasure craft. The boat was about 250 yards off of Sea Isle Marina.

    Eleven minutes later, a Coast Guard crew found the boat. The crew got four adults and three children out of the water, the Coast Guard said. Tow Boat U.S. got another adult and two other children out of the water, the Coast Guard said.

    All 10 people were taken to shore. Only minor medical concerns were reported, the Coast Guard said.

    The Coast Guard said. commercial salvage surfaced the vessel and towed it back to the marina.

  11. #18 – er

    uh

    um………………Ya reckon anyone might care if the bounty on ole Zimmerman gets paid via food stamps?

    /snark OFF

  12. I was at WalMart buying a bag of Purina dog chow yesterday. A woman behind me asked if I had a dog. I told her that no, I didn’t have a dog, I was starting the Purina Diet again, and that I probably shouldn’t, because I ended up in the hospital last time, but that I’d lost 50 pounds. . I told her that it was essentially a Perfect Diet and all you do is load your pockets with Purina Nuggets and simply eat one or two every time you feel hungry. The food is nutritionally complete so it works well and I was going to try it again. Horrified, she asked if I ended up in intensive care, because the dog food poisoned me.

    I told her no, I stooped down in the parking lot to sniff a poodle’s butt and a car hit me.

  13. #22 Katfish

    Ya reckon anyone might care if the bounty on ole Zimmerman gets paid via food stamps?

    Yea, I do, because you can’t use the card in liquor stores or casinos.

  14. 114 years ago, during the River War in the Sudan:

    How dreadful are the curses which Mohammedanism lays on its votaries! Besides the fanatical frenzy, which is as dangerous in a man as hydrophobia in a dog, there is this fearful fatalistic apathy. The effects are apparent in many countries. Improvident habits, slovenly systems of agriculture, sluggish methods of commerce, and insecurity of property exist wherever the followers of the Prophet rule or live. A degraded sensualism deprives this life of its grace and refinement; the next of its dignity and sanctity. The fact that in Mohammedan law every woman must belong to some man as his absolute property—either as a child, a wife, or a concubine—must delay the final extinction of slavery until the faith of Islam has ceased to be a great power among men. Individual Moslems may show splendid qualities. Thousands become the brave and loyal soldiers of the Queen: all know how to die. But the influence of the religion paralyzes the social development of those who follow it. No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. Far from being moribund, Mohammedanism is a militant and proseltyzing faith. It has already spread throughout Central Africa, raising fearless warriors at every step; and were it not that Christianity is sheltered in the strong arms of science—the science against which it had vainly struggled—the civilization of modern Europe might fall, as fell the civilization of ancient Rome.

    Steven Hayward has an extremely rare, original, 1899 hardcover first edition of this book.

    Lucky man. Even the abridged 1902 second edition sells for $2000.00 in good condition.

  15. 25Texpat

    From the article:

    That last sentence begs the question: when radical Islam catches up with “the strong arms of science,” such as, for example, with an Iranian nuclear weapon, what then?

  16. If it’s campaign slogans that Obummer wants, then try one of these from my “Top Ten” list:

    1) It Doesn’t Get Any Better Than This

    2) Socialism: For A Better America

    3) President “Entitlement” Needs Your Vote

    4) Four More Years of “Hope” and “Change”

    5) Get The American Dream: “Big Government”

    6) MooMoo Is Not Thru Eating

    7) MooMoo Needs More Vacations

    8) “Hope” You Don’t “Change” Presidents

    9) Reelect Robin Hood

    10) Four More Years of Stimulus

    I hope one of these will do.

  17. Happy birthday Astrodome, you’ve lived a good life.

    Now it is time for the Astrodome to join Breitbart as a fading memory and be replaced by a multi-story parking garage. The fees charged in the facility could go toward paying off the lingering debt from the Bud Adams fiasco and provide much needed parking in the area. The best thing would be that it makes sense and would just drive people nutzo the thought of turning the “holy ground of the Astrodome” into something useful.

  18. I found out yesterday morning that a lady, who’s very active with the youth in our parish, was at the Easter vigil with her two sons. One of them disappeared during the vigil, and she found him at home – he hanged himself.

    I can only imagine what this mother must be going through. Why? I saw her son during the day, and he was smiling and being helpful. There must have been some dark thoughts. Those teenage years are so turbulent, and even parents cannot always tell when their kids are in danger.

  19. Squawk, even though you may not appreciate the whole “Breitbart is here” thing, it does mean something to some people.

    When I see it, it’s symbolic of a movement. It reminds me of a tactic of standing up to the media. When I see “Breitbart is here,” I think of people who are willing to continue his fight against liberalism.

    I don’t know what others here think, but your continued derision of the meme is no longer funny to me. I feel like you’re spitting on his grave, which would be disrespectful of any person. Some of us actually admired him for taking the heat he did. He put himself on the front line of the media assault in order for others to be heard and for corruption and stupidity to be brought into the sunlight.

  20. Now it is time for the Astrodome to join Breitbart as a fading memory and be replaced by a multi-story parking garage. The fees charged in the facility could go toward paying off the lingering debt from the Bud Adams fiasco and provide much needed parking in the area.

    Astrobart is our albatross. In addition to Adams renovation bill still not paid off ($40M – how can that possibly be? I seem to recall those costs being $80M in 1989), I saw on the local news last week that it will cost up to $120M just to tear it down because of all the asbestos.

  21. Some of us actually admired him for taking the heat he did.

    I think it’s safe to say ALL of us here admired Breitbart’s work. I won’t speak for Squawk, but I find it somewhat disrespectful to turn him into a slogan.

  22. Well, I guess that’s where we’ll have to disagree. Slogans don’t necessarily cheapen a person’s memory – in this case, I think it extends his fight. As in, “you think he’s gone, but…”

    I say, shove Breitbart in their face as long as we can. He’d love to see the reaction it causes in his opponents. It’s like mentioning “Bush” to an Democrat. And when they get angry, they look even more irrational than normal.

  23. 39 Hamous says:
    April 9, 2012 at 11:18 am
    Why not just take up his cause and expose the Left for their hypocrisy, lies, and dangerous, America-killing dogma?

    You mean do what he did, but not the way he did it?

  24. I mean, seriously.

    We see how much it bugs some of the people that agreed with him, imagine what it does to those who hate him.

  25. Tedtam
    Let me very succinct here. I will make no apology for my lampooning of the Breitbart meme.

    After a period the meme becomes nothing more than an inside “joke” that most people do not understand. You can chastise me all you want, but the reality is that after November Breitbart will be nothing more than a memory to most folks, another passing fad, another rallying point that garners many followers only to see the members quickly fall away and to see those same members regather with the next slogan or symbol. It all becomes as hollow as the yellow ribbons that people wear.

    If as many people put themselves ON THE FRONT LINE as Breitbart did that engage in simple sloganeering of the meme then I would be silent. “Breitbart is here” means nothing to me other than 3 words with a link. I seriously doubt that those 3 words cause anyone to do much more than press the link and read another story in the long line of “another stories” posted in this or any other blog.

    I did not know Breitbart and could care less about Breitbart so how you can accuse me of “spitting on his grave” is beyond me. I won’t, but I could list 3 citizen activist/journalists that I “respect” more than Breitbart and they do not get the headlines or a simple thank you from “Joe Populous” for the fine work they do. My lampooning of the meme is not even aimed at Breitbart. It is aimed directly at those that irritate me with the repetitive posting of the same 3 words with a link as I have irritated you.

  26. Whatever.

    I’ve got work to do. We’re all entitled to our opinions. I’m not changing yours, you’re not changing mine.

  27. You mean do what he did, but not the way he did it?

    That doesn’t even make sense. The way he did it? I’ll tell you how he didn’t do it. He didn’t do it by posting “‘insert name’ is here” everywhere.

    We see how much it bugs some of the people that agreed with him, imagine what it does to those who hate him.

    First, it doesn’t bug me. I simply think it’s a shallow fad that will run its course in due time. It’s a waste of electrons. It accomplishes precisely nothing. If you want to accomplish something to honor him, GO OUT AND DO WHAT HE DID, don’t turn him into a freaking Pet Rock.

  28. As far as me admiring Breitbart, I am no respecter of any man. The guy found his niche and filled it quite well. As far as throwing him in the lefts face? They could care less. He is dead and they know it. He, personally, cannot harm them any longer.

    The guys that run his web pages carry on what he started but they are just one outlet among many the daily expose the left. So I will pose this, all things being equal, the only thing that made Breitbart “special” is he got noticed and he died at an early age. For his family and friends his death is a tragedy. We still have Michelle Malkin, Drudge still filters through the sludge, Serge’s favorite Ace of Spades regularly posts some great stuff, Ed Morrissey is always mowing down the left, Texpat (PBUH) brings to light many things that have gone unnoticed in the media. I do not see any memes about them. Oh wait they ain’t dead (THANK GOD). Maybe later huh?

    Breitbart was an in yer face type of guy. Hell way back in the golden age of 60 Minutes even Mike Wallace tore into government injustice on both sides. That is all that made him famous. Before Rush fell out of grace or got long in the tooth there was the “Rush is Right” bumper stickers and had blogs been popular 19 years ago that would have been the meme. “Breitbart is here” is nothing more than a yellow ribbon to make some people feel good that they are doing something. The good news is it does not cost $12.50 plus $10.00 for popcorn and a drink to feel like they are doing something (Serge’).

  29. “Breitbart is here” is nothing more than a yellow ribbon to make some people feel good that they are doing something.

    Which is a thing so bad you just have to call attention to it and demean it.

    Good for you, you’re saving the world every bit as much, and in exactly the same way as you say I am.

  30. “Breitbart is here” is nothing more than a yellow ribbon to make some people feel good that they are doing something.

    That’s what I was reaching for but couldn’t quite grasp. Everyone knows breast cancer is bad, m-kay? But having every professional athlete wear pink gear once a year doesn’t do a thing to cure it and if you don’t wear pink it doesn’t mean you love breast cancer.

    Living Colour is here.

  31. #17 Sarge

    We’ll Put A Millionaire In Every Pot

    Conjures up the standard image of a missionary in a pot.
    Coincidence?
    I thought not.
    :)

  32. #28 RM
    I’m partial to your #4:

    Four More Years of “Hope” and “Change”

    (Could they be stupid enough to try that one?? Oh, I wish.)

  33. I always thought the yellow ribbon thing was kind of personal, not some forgotten group hug. The two counties in which I spend most of my time have quite a few homes with yellow ribbons for relatives serving in combat zones overseas. I do notice. I do say a little prayer. We light a candle and pray as a congregation at each service that they carry God’s peace with them and for their safe return.

  34. 60 wb
    I have a farmer’s tan, not a wife beater tan.
    Besides, I have a fine silver mane. Unlike some of the baldies around here.

  35. That’s what I was reaching for but couldn’t quite grasp. Everyone knows breast cancer is bad, m-kay? But having every professional athlete wear pink gear once a year doesn’t do a thing to cure it and if you don’t wear pink it doesn’t mean you love breast cancer.

    I think the point here is that we all got that about 10 days ago.

  36. #64

    I suspect you are in the same boat as I, any wife beating ideas would not work out well for me.

  37. #57 Pyro
    Oh, DROPPING. I thought you said Drooping, then got all confused when your link was about skirt length…

  38. It just struck me as funny how this thread started out at poking fun at Obamaneering slogans. Let little old speedo wearing, Cuban Cigar smoking, coffee drinking, bearded weirdo me gore a tea partayyyy holy relic and a fuss is caused.

    Trust me y’all, there are more important things to get upset over than this. LOL you do not not need my blessing to meme away. Just remember this:

    breitbart.com is here.

  39. Oh and Serge’, you ain’t botherin me. But you are doing a good job of making my point for me. Thanks. You remind me of my 3 year old daughter when she learned the word booger. It was cute for about 20 minutes, well you know the rest.

  40. 63 Shannon says:
    April 9, 2012 at 2:36 pm
    I always thought the yellow ribbon thing was kind of personal, not some forgotten group hug. The two counties in which I spend most of my time have quite a few homes with yellow ribbons for relatives serving in combat zones overseas. I do notice. I do say a little prayer. We light a candle and pray as a congregation at each service that they carry God’s peace with them and for their safe return.

    Elizabeth and I were more Old School when Josh went to Iraq. We hung a White Star Son In Service flag from the window, and prayed that it wouldn’t turn gold.

    It was a sensless gesture, I know, but it made her feel better.

  41. I think the point here is that we all got that about 10 days ago.

    Fantastic. That coming from the Sensei of “Let’s see if I can run this obsession completely into the ground” means so much more.

  42. We went through several false starts (orders changes) during Desert Storm with my stepson (Marine Force Recon). I just about didn’t show for the third “goodbye”, it was so painful. Yellow ribbons are not a good analogy.

  43. 76
    Only Diovan, Lanoxin, aspirin, Robaxin, and generic zyzal.
    And prednesone since yesterday.

  44. Fantastic. That coming from the Sensei of “Let’s see if I can run this obsession completely into the ground” means so much more.

    Yah.

    Kinda my point, too.

  45. Shannon – You poor man, it sounds like a full-time job to sort out all those pills into 7-day pill boxes.

    You left out Viagra.

  46. I always thought the yellow ribbon thing was kind of personal, not some forgotten group hug.

    That’s what it should be. A prayer. Not a movement.

  47. It takes a while.

    Isn’t that one of the first symptoms that shows the little blue pill is needed?

    Just sayin’

  48. #90 – Wellllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll he IS about due for another visit to Katy for re-stocking!

    MEGASNIKKER™ :)

    (we’re actually old enough now we can no longer recall who corrupted WHO)

  49. I went to the post office today and made a comment about a “benjamin”, aka $100 bill and she asked me if Ben Franklin was on the $100 bill because he was the 100th president? Lets not forget that Ben Franklin was the first postmaster general. I calmly told her that, no Franklin was not the 100th president as we are on the 44th now, further, Ben Franklin is the only guy on a bill that was never president. She was amazed, she had no idea. And that person’s vote counts just as much as mine (insert comic book black tornado over my head).
    /cusses, spits and shakes head.

  50. Shocking trivia.
    The #1 selling rock album of the seventies was The Wall and not Dark Side of The Moon.

    I know Dark Side had more legs and ultimately sold more over the decades since.

  51. #101 Judging by some of the looks of the wimminzes in there, the rules were being followed.
    /ducks and hauls butt, running zigzag pattern

  52. #92 Katfish

    I never did acid, mescaline, or shrooms. I tried coke twice in my twenties and it scared me both times. After seeing other folks use it, speed never appealed to me, at all.

    I guess I’m a wimp, or that whole line about cannabis being a ‘gateway drug’ (that Obama’s drug czar is still spewing) is just a bunch of government BPH propaganda.

  53. #108 – in general I’d say yes – SOME folks a lot more than others (and mostly short term memory is affected in those that are affected)

  54. If I start using wacky tabacky right away, maybe that can be my excuse. What were we talking about again?

  55. 108/109 Katfish is correct. It affects different people in different ways, and much depends on the frequency of consumption. I was a heavy user in college, sparking a doob with my morning coffee, but never had any issues with short term memory, studied little and had a decent GPA.

    At night, when I was on the air was a different story. It affected the speech center of my brain more so than other people. I never opened the mic when stoned.

    Again, frequency of use, as with alcohol, is the key. These days it’s once every now and then for me.

    [A public service message NOT brought to you by the ONDCP…]

  56. All I know is, five Andrew Jacksons just doesn’t last very long these days.

    We’re going to be vegans soon…ObamaVegans.

  57. I paid seven bucks for a sliced beef sandwich at Bellville Meat Market, Saturday.

    Beef – The New Truffles.

  58. Man, I just dropped in and scrolled through all the comments, hitting the high spots and a lot of y’all talked about various drugs, and I was wondering if some of you have used drugs at any time in any form, it’s NOT any of my business Butt other than bob42 and KatFish, I don’t remember many of you saying that you’ve used drugs. I’m 58 and I’ve NEVER, EVER used any ILLEGAL drug of any kind, I grew up in the 60’s and everyone I knew were scared to death of using drugs because they’d screw up your mind. We did have a few Druggies in High School but they were mostly just “White Trash” and a few kids from FT Rucker. :?:

  59. Locally pronounced, “Bell-vul”.
    The high school mascot pronounced, “Bray-merz”, not “Brah-mahz”.

  60. bob #107;

    I guess I’m a wimp, or that whole line about cannabis being a ‘gateway drug’ (that Obama’s drug czar is still spewing) is just a bunch of government BPH propaganda.

    So, tell me, was the first illegal drug you used cannabis? You know, before the coke?

  61. I love sloganeering:

    We’re not done yet – There Are Still Terrorists Out There
    The Budget Ain’t Balanced Yet
    VOTE DEMOCRAT – We’re not perfect, but they’re nuts
    Republicans say government doesn’t work & then they get elected & prove it
    At Least The War On Women Is Going Well
    If Republicans Hate Government So Much Vote Them Out
    It was Yes WE can! Not Yes HE Can
    VOTING IS LIKE DRIVING: Choose “R” to Go Backward – Choose “D” to Go Forward
    Want Small Gov’t and Low Taxes? Move to Somalia
    The GOP Would Shrink Gov’t to Fit In Your Bedroom
    REPUBLICANS – BRIDGE TO THE 11th CENTURY
    The System’s Not Broken – IT’S FIXED
    If You Think Education is Expensive, Try Ignorance
    Capitalism will never fail. Socialism will always be there to bail it out
    VOTE DEMOCRAT – Who Else Will Clean Up After The Elephants
    The REPUBLICANS – Where Ignorance Meets Arrogance
    Don’t Trust Our Future to Leaders Who Plan for The End Times
    HEY REPUBLICANS – Stop Campaigning & Help Us Govern
    Hey! How Did All These Conservatives Get Into My Bedroom
    The REPUBLICANS – Boldly Going In Circles
    WHEN PEOPLE THINK, DEMOCRATS WIN

  62. WHEN PEOPLE HANG THEIR BRAINS ON THE HAT RACK BEFORE ENTERING THE VOTING BOOTH THINK, DEMOCRATS WIN

    Fixed it fer ya.

  63. Someone convinced us you could smoke dried grapevine when we were little boys. It wasn’t a getting high type thing. After that experience, why I ever smoked anything else I’ll never know. Terrible idea.
    Grapevine – my gateway drug.

  64. #121 – Now SD – you be majorly ASSUMIN pahdnah……………..nowhere did I specifically stipulate usage (in fairness I did not deny any either)

    I’ve learned well from my life of observing all the inside-the-beltway thieves………………..

    “I can neither confirm nor deny……….”

  65. If You Think Education is Expensive, Try Ignorance

    Proved nightly by a guy who will never sign his own paycheck. Unless he gets one of those GSA Commissioner gigs.

  66. #25 texpat

    All right, I’ll take the bait.

    The conflict between good and evil which proceeds unceasingly in the breast of man nowhere reaches such an intensity as in the Jewish race. The dual nature of mankind is nowhere more strongly or more terribly exemplified. We owe to the Jews in the Christian revelation a system of ethics which, even if it were entirely separated from the supernatural, would be incomparably the most precious possession of mankind, worth in fact the fruits of all other wisdom and learning put together. On that system and by that faith there has been built out of the wreck of the Roman Empire the whole of our existing civilization.
    And it may well be that this same astounding race may at the present time be in the actual process of producing another system of morals and philosophy, as malevolent as Christianity was benevolent, which, if not arrested, would shatter irretrievably all that Christianity has rendered possible. It would almost seem as if the gospel of Christ and the gospel of Antichrist were destined to originate among the same people; and that this mystic and mysterious race had been chosen for the supreme manifestations, both of the divine and the diabolical. Winston Churchill 08 Feb 1920

  67. Whoohoo Saw our first hummingbird of the season. One of God’s little pleasures. He flew right up to my face as if to ask if the diner was going to re-open this year. I love them little critters.

  68. So why do we have to read about this in a UK paper for IT folks?

    I smell a conspiracy to keep the truth from us. ;)

    Rabid skunks attack US
    A persistent drought and a mild winter has caused a spike in the number of rabid skunks invading the the suburban landscapes of states from up in South Dakota to down in New Mexico.

  69. “users” who register here.

    I used to check the registration email via Google. There are plenty of places that track forum spammers. I’d grab there IP addy etc and plug it into this plugin. I also added captcha to the registration page while leaving the other folks alone when they sign in.

  70. These guys still want the traitor released.

    The White House rejected the appeal by Israeli president Shimon Peres to grant clemency to Jonathan Pollard on Monday, saying its position hasn’t changed, and that the president has no intention to release Pollard.
    President Shimon Peres sent a personal letter to President Obama on Monday, urging Obama to consider granting clemency to Jonathan Pollard, citing the convicted spy’s deteriorating health.

  71. Just punching the IP into google would bring up good info. I had 6 servers in Russia and environs that vBulletin could filter out. But them suckers were ingenious in hopping around. As soon as I discovered them, another two would pop up.

  72. Well the Boy called to ask me a trivia question, 90% of the folks here would know the answer but he and his bride didn’t,…where did the Teddy Bear get his name? I S’plained it all, I even told him about “Big Medicine” :wink:

    Introduced in 1904, the .405 Win. cartridge was the most powerful round ever developed for a Winchester lever-action rifle. Roosevelt had to have not one, not two, but three 1895s in .405, and it proved very effective on almost every sort of game in Africa. The big 300 gr. bullet was a hard hitter with an initial muzzle velocity of more than 2230 fps.

  73. This is interesting, Herman Cain is feting Bartbreit at his next 9-9-9 Patriot Summit rally. And it has free liquor!

    Reception Honoring Andrew Breitbart Sun, April 15 5:30pm EDT
    Patriot Summit registration at 4:30pm EDT and reception from 5:30pm-7:30pm. Includes complimentary cocktail reception & awards reception honoring Andrew Breitbart. Location: Renaissance Arlington Capitol View
    Apr 14, 2012 Free

  74. Shamaal
    Yeah they were a pain to deal with. I went through our LST registrants and culled some 2000 names one weekend (boredom). Checked again the next and 100+ replaced them. I found that a strong captcha system was the best way to keep the bots out. I thought about blocking throw-a-way email addys but that would have blocked bunches of legit people.

    I tried the ole email confirmation trick but a good bot is set up to respond back in the positive.

  75. #132 shamaal

    If you’ve accidentally stumbled upon the widely known fact Winston Churchill was both a great admirer of the Jews and also a critic at certain times in his life, well, congratulations…blind hogs, acorns and all that.

  76. #123 Darren

    So, tell me, was the first illegal drug you used cannabis? You know, before the coke?

    Yup, it was. I was 18. Three years later the chief engineer and one of the sharper dudes I’ve known offered me a line of coke after we’d done maintenance on a transmitter. I tried it then, and again a couple of weeks later. That was enough for me.

    If you’re attempting to make another positive argument for the government’s “gateway drug” myth, hang it up. We’ve been there and done that, as I recall, and all of the reliable evidence is against such a notion.

  77. #59 Hamous

    Did anybody else recognize the distinctive voice of the Matt Clark character, the railroad detective, on the Black Bart video clip ?

    If you did, then you probably realized it was this guy.

  78. We had a reasonably good captcha system that they would get hung up on, but I had one romanian server that I think employed unoccupied livejazmin girls to do the replies. Eventually it became overwhelming.

  79. #141 texpat

    Not stumbled, as you mentioned it’s well documented. He was what would now be called a philo-semite.
    But he was still a product of his times that identified Jews as being a separate race as opposed to merely being an ethnic group. He writes in the article of atheistic jews.
    Hopefully that type of folderol is dying out.

  80. Yup, it was. I was 18. Three years later the chief engineer and one of the sharper dudes I’ve known offered me a line of coke after we’d done maintenance on a transmitter.

    So this dude had a First Class License?!?! He HAD to have one to work on ANY transmitter and he was such a STUPID SOB that he got wasted at work!? Did the FCC ever come down on you idiots for over modulation (assuming AM)? FWIW; I have a First Class License and I never did anything so SAS to lose it, not even tweaking the DAYAAM CB radio junk that all the idiots used in the 70’s-80’s :sad:

  81. Texpat says:

    April 9, 2012 at 8:27 pm

    #59 Hamous

    Did anybody else recognize the distinctive voice of the Matt Clark character, the railroad detective, on the Black Bart video clip ?

    If you did, then you probably realized it was this guy.

    Known in the biz as the poor man’s John Wayne.

  82. Stoner mharper
    CC: Stoner Hamous
    (“Stoner” = Stone Ager)

    This is actually my third attempt to respond to your follow up on Indians being Stone Aged culture. The first time I erased my response accidentally (in case I did not make that clear) and that was a lengthy response. My second response was being typed on Word and the dog shut off the power underneath the computer desk. I figure either God above or Satan below is trying to prevent this response from coming to fruition. ;)

    This message is primarily to you but since Hamous backed up your initial portrayal that the ancient American Indians advanced no further than the stone age as “correct” this response has him in mind as well. My first response, as I said, was lengthy, this third response will be lengthier. So strap in and enjoy. I’ll break up the response into two parts. The first part regarding metallurgy in ancient America and the second regarding the model for placing the Book of Mormon peoples and Brian D. Stubbs’ linguistic research .

    My initial reply to you which made it on the blog post neglected to include the omniscient oracle Wikipedia whose summarization of ancient American metallurgy is very similar to other sources I’ve seen report on the matter. Look at Metallurgy in pre-Columbian America. Here’s a summary of their summary in South America, Mesoamerica, and in North America. All three regions had metallurgic products and used metal. I’ll change the politically correct dating to the traditional Jesus based dating. So Wiki’s “BCE” should be seen as “BC” and its “CE” should be seen as “AD”.

    South America:

    South American metal working seems to have developed in the Andean region of modern Peru and Bolivia with gold being hammered and shaped into intricate objects, particularly ornaments.[4] Recent finds date the earliest metal work to 2155 to 1936 BC.[5]

    This date would coordinate with the Jaredite civilization which lasted from 2,500 BC from the Tower of Babel to around 300 AD when the last known survivor of that civilization was discovered by a people called the Mulekites. Because of this discovery there is a group of Mormons proposing a South American model at least in part to research the Book of Mormon peoples. Here’s some of the uses thought to have occurred:

    Unlike in other metallurgy traditions where metals gain importance due to their widespread use from weaponry to everyday utensils, metals in South America (and later in Central America) were mainly valued as adornments and objects representative of a high status (this not to say that some more functional objects were not being produced). It is during the Early horizon that advancements in metal working result in spectacular and characteristically Andean gold objects made by the joining of smaller metal sheets and also gold-silver alloy appears.

    Weapons, utensils, adornments, objects of status, and objects made by “the joining of smaller metal sheets and also of gold-silver alloy”. Each objects is precisely as the Book of Mormon claims for the use of metals, including ‘joining of (sic) metal sheets’.
    Here’s a take on the level of technology and process of this metallurgy:

    Evidence for fully developed smelting however only appears with the Moche culture (northern coast, 200 BC—600 AD). The ores were being extracted at shallow deposits in the Andean foothill, whether by specialised workers or slaves/prisoners is unclear. In any case the ores are believed to have been smelted at nearby locations, evidenced in the actual metal artefacts and from ceramic vessels depicting the process, which is believed to have been occurring in adobe brick furnaces with at least 3 blow pipes to provide the air flow needed to reach the high temperatures. The resulting ingots would then have been moved to coastal centres where shaping of the object would occur in specialised workshops. Both of the workshops found and studied were located near administrative sections of the respective towns – again indicative of the high value placed upon metal.

    That seems like a pretty advanced pretty advanced development of metals in ancient America. And, as mentioned i n the last sentence, metal was highly valued. This Moche culture’s time frame would coordinate with both the Jaredite and the Nephite civilizations.

    This technology gradually spread north into Colombia, Panama and Costa Rica, reaching Guatemala and Belize by 800 AD.

    Simply put, this technology reached central America a bit after the end of the Nephite civilization which would mean that the Lamanites continued metallurgic process. When it reached them.

    Mesoamerica

    Metallurgy only appears in Mesoamerica in 800 AD with the best evidence from west Mexico. Much like in South American, fine metals were seen as a material for the elite. Metal’s special qualities of colour and resonance seemed to have appealed most and then led to the particular technological developments seen in the region.[9]

    And:

    Continual contact kept the flow of ideas from that same region and latter, coinciding with the development of Andean long distance maritime trade, influence from further south seems to have reached the region and lead to a second period (1200-1300 AD to the Spanish arrival).[11] By this time, copper alloys were being explored by West Mexican metallurgists some because the different mechanical properties were needed to fashion specific artefacts like particularly axe monies – further evidence for contact with the Andean region – but in general developed the new properties such alloys introduced to match their own regional representations – specially wirework bells, which at times had such high tin content in the bronze that it was irrelevant for its mechanical properties, but gave it a golden colour.

    The main point I’d like to emphasize here is that clearly there’s archeological evidence of metal use by the time Columbus reached the americas. In fact the article continues:

    The actual artifacts and then techniques were imported from the south, but west Mexican metallurgists worked ores from the abundant local deposits- the metal was not being imported. Even when the technology spread from West into north-eastern, central and southern Mexico, artifacts that can be traced back to West Mexican ores are abundant, if not exclusive.

    (snip)

    It is not always clear if the metal reached its final destination as an ingot, an ore or a finished artifact. Provenance studies on metal artifacts from southern mesoamerica cast with the lost-wax technique and dissimilar to west Mexican artefacts have shown that there might have been a second point of emergence of metallurgy into mesoamerica there since no known source could be identified.[12]

    The Aztecs did not initially adopt metal working, even if they had acquired metal objects from other people. However, as conquest gained them metal working regions, the technology started to spread. By the time of the Spanish conquest, a blooming bronze smelting technology seemed to be nascent.

    This is hardly a stone age society.

    North America:

    Archaeological evidence has not revealed metal smelting or alloying of metals by pre-Columbian indigenous peoples north of the Rio Grande River; however, they did use native copper extensively.[14]

    As widely accepted as this statement might be it should not be considered synonymous with a lack of metal objects, as it points out native copper was abundant particular in the Great Lakes region and “overlooks the simple fact that there was really very little to be gained by smelting…”[15] The latest glacial period had resulted in the scouring of copper bearing rocks. Once the ice retreated, these were readily available for use in a variety of sizes.[16] Copper was shaped via cold hammering into objects from very early dates (Archaic period in the Great Lakes region: 8000-1000 BC). There is also evidence of actual mining of copper veins(Old Copper Complex), but disagreement exists as to the dates.[17]

    Despite the lack of “smelting” there was no lack of metal use even in North America and this would include the timeframe of the Jaredite nation.

    Great Lake artifacts found in the Eastern Woodlands of North America seem to indicate there were widespread trading networks by 1000 BC. Progressively the usage of copper for tools decreases with more jewellery and adornments being found. This is believed to be indicative of social changes to a more hierarchical society.[18]
    However this Great Lake model as a unique source of copper and of copper technologies remaining somewhat static for over 6000 years has recently come into some level of criticism, particularly since other deposits seem to have been available to ancient North Americans, even if a lot smaller.[19][20]

    In part of the discoveries of metal objects there are those who propose a North American or ‘Heartland” model to study the Book of Mormon peoples.

    If you go to LDS.org, the official website of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, you can click on “Menu” above, then on “Scriptures”. To the right there’s a search bar. Type in “metal” and set the filters to include only Book of Mormon mentions of “metal”. You should get only two hits. The first hit would be Ether 10:23:

    23 And they did work in all manner of ore, and they did make gold, and silver, and iron, and brass, and all manner of metals; and they did dig it out of the earth; wherefore, they did cast up mighty heaps of earth to get ore, of gold, and of silver, and of iron, and of copper. And they did work all manner of fine work.

    The Book of Ether would be the story of the Jaredites while the second hit would be found in

    Helaman 6:9:

    9 And it came to pass that they became exceedingly rich, both the Lamanites and the Nephites; and they did have an exceeding plenty of gold, and of silver, and of all manner of precious metals, both in the land south and in the land north.

    The Book of Helaman would be about the Nephites whose civilization lasted from around 600 Bcto 400 AD. In both these cases I find their accounts very compatible with the archeological evidence we have today regarding the development and use of metals in ancient the americas.

    Redo the same search on the LDS website and type in “steel”. You should get 5 hits but only three of which would be steel in the americas. The First Book of Nephi’s mention of steel would have taken place in the Old World. “Steel” among the Nephites is only mentioned twice. They are found in 2 Nephi 2:15 and Jarom 1:8.

    And I did teach my people to build buildings, and to work in all manner of wood, and of iron, and of copper, and of brass, and of steel, and of gold, and of silver, and of precious ores, which were in great abundance.

    And:

    And we multiplied exceedingly, and spread upon the face of the land, and became exceedingly rich in gold, and in silver, and in precious things, and in fine workmanship of wood, in buildings, and in machinery, and also in iron and copper, and brass and steel, making all manner of tools of every kind to till the ground, and weapons of war—yea, the sharp pointed arrow, and the quiver, and the dart, and the javelin, and all preparations for war.

    Both these books would have been written very early on in the Nephite history. This is indicative that steel was once used but apparently lost.

    The last reference is found in Ether 7:9:

    Wherefore, he came to the hill Ephraim, and he did molten out of the hill, and made swords out of steel for those whom he had drawn away with him; and after he had armed them with swords he returned to the city Nehor, and gave battle unto his brother Corihor, by which means he obtained the kingdom and restored it unto his father Kib.

    Again, this being mentioned once in its entire historical account is indicative of a technology being lost. Another consideration is that of the location of the Book of Mormon peoples. If they settled in humid areas, steel would rust quite quickly and therefore its use would be less desirable. One thing is very clear though, that the technology to develop metal was in existence before Columbus came to the Americas.

  83. #146 Super Dave, the key word there is “after we’d done maintenance on a transmitter.”

    I got my 3rd class w/broadcast endorsement while in high school, and my 2nd class phone during my stoner days in college. Neither he nor I worked on anything while under the influence of anything. Between us we took care of three stations in the market 2 FM and 1 AM (we were on the air at competing stations.) As long as he signed off on the work, the 2nd class was good enough for me to do it solo.

  84. DAYAAM CB radio junk

    C.W. McCAll should be hung, cut, shot, drawn and quartered and then exiled to Patmos for stirring up the CB craze.

  85. mharper (your posts/land model /Stubbs);

    Now, if I read your posts correctly you seem to think that the Book of Mormon peoples settled only in North America. There are LDS members who think as much and that’s fine but I don’t. I once thought of the people being exclusively in North America then I changed that to incorporating both North and South America and now I tend to think of a limited model of settlement. I currently think of them as having lived in Mesoamerica. That doesn’t fit well with the archeological evidence of metals and the Book of Mormon account but I think overall the Mesoamerican model is the best fit for the Book of Mormon story. This is especially true as more knowledge of the Mayans comes to light. In particular, the Mayan history is quite passive until suddenly a massive war broke out and records of cruelty and even torture shows the ugliness of that war. The date of this war fits almost perfectly with the Book of Mormons account of the last war which wiped the Nephite nation from existence. In the Book of Mormon account, Captain Mormon once refused to serve as top commander since the once righteous people of God resorted to cruelty and blood vengeance. Though I will not place much credit in the discovery of Tulum, there is the possibility that the main temple found there patterns after the Temple of Solomon. Though even if this is true I would not place the temple at Tulum as the temple Nephi had constructed. Here’s what Nephi says:

    And I, Nephi, did build a temple; and I did construct it after the manner of the temple of Solomon save it were not built of so many precious things; for they were not to be found upon the land, wherefore, it could not be built like unto Solomon’s temple. But the manner of the construction was like unto the temple of Solomon; and the workmanship thereof was exceedingly fine.

    (2 Nephi 5:16)

    Also, the Mayans kept book records as opposed to simple belts or pictographs on rocks.
    Truth be told, there is no official declaration by Joseph Smith or any leader of the LDS Church as to the exact placement of the Book of Mormon peoples. Al that is official is that it was primarily in the Americas.

    You mentioned skepticism on researching ancient America from Mormons. Why? Who do you think launched archeological research into the Old World but by Christians? While there are Mormons, and I’m sure researchers are among them who’d love to find a “smoking gun”, by and large, they don’t care where the academics take them. Knowledge of the Book of Mormon’s truth is not based on man’s science but from pure and direct communication with God. It is His Holy Spirit which opens up one’s mind and heart to His truths regardless of what man’s science says. While I have read of scholars who have left the Church because what they found on an academic level did not substantiate what they though they would find. To them I say they are more than welcome to come back but if their conscience dictates something else then God speed to them. I know the Book of Mormon is the true word of God and an accurate account of what happened in the Americas and I know this by the same power by which I know the Bible to be the true word of God and an accurate account of the happenings of the Old World and that is by the Holy Spirit of God.

    As for Brian D Stubbs, thus far his work is remarkably impressive. As I said before he has demonstrated large amounts of linguistic patterns between Native American dialects and that of Near Eastern dialects namely from Hebrew, Egyptian, and Arabic. His research has thus far impressed his peers though it is far from conclusive. What Stubbs is doing is studying Indian dialects while helping to reconstruct the proto language from which they came from. The reconstruction of the proto langue is a huge task and can take decades to do. The proto language is identified as Utu-Aztecan and it is from this that dialects evolved which dialects show a high number of lexicon vocabulary from the Near East. Not at all the sole source of their linguistic evolution but thus far it is pretty clear that there is an influence. Stubbs is a math nut as well and is well aware of the probability against him but as I said, thus far his research is quite promising. Far more than to dismiss it as chasing Bigfoot as Hamous said. If anything, just watch at least one of the videos I linked. Better yet, take some time to read the article I linked and feel free to critique it. I’m sure there are critiques out there.

    Thanks for your inquiries. Sorry for the delayed response but boy was I flustered when my first attempt to make this lengthy reply got wiped out. I needed a breather.

    Like the claim of constructing buildings of cement, the claim to have used metals in the Book of Mormon was a source of ridicule by the scholars. Like cement, the more we find out about the ancient inhabitant of the Americas the bore the Book of Mormon is authenticated. In fact the way I see it, if you take the development of archeology of the Americas and use it as a rubric, then one can easily predict that more archeological discoveries will support the Book of Mormon.

  86. So BSue has forced me into watching THE VOICE where they are featuring female guitarists on 8 foot stilts. Sigh. Where is Ted Mack and the original Amateur Hour?

  87. bob #142;

    Yup, it was. I was 18.

    Thanks. That’s all I needed but will still include the following:

    Three years later the chief engineer and one of the sharper dudes I’ve known offered me a line of coke after we’d done maintenance on a transmitter. I tried it then, and again a couple of weeks later. That was enough for me.

    I never used marijuana and when coke was in my presence I never used it either. Interesting, eh?

    Likewise if none of my children ever use marijuana then I’ll have little to no concern of them using coke.

    Thanks again.

  88. Squawk

    One of the weirder stories in the music biz is that of “C.W. McCall”. He was the fictitious persona of a guy named Bill Fries and created by his friend, composer and record producer, Chip Davis. Davis was a classically trained musician, but, hey, everybody’s got to make a living.

    Anyway, Chip Davis and his partner, Jackson Berkey, went on to fame and fortune as the guys who created the instrumental powerhouse, Mannheim Steamroller. When they shopped their first album to all the major record companies, nobody wanted anything to do with them. Damn the bad luck – they started their own label and ended up being in control of their destiny and a giant pile of money.

  89. #148 Squawkster, I didn’t mean to pull your chain, BUTT, back in another life I was an Avionics Technician, worked on Nav/Com Transceivers, ADF’s, Glide Slope, Marker Beacons, DME’s, Transponders, HF’s, Radar, Radar Altimeters and Autopilots. This was when the CB craze was in full force and EVERY IDIOT had one and most of them wanted me to crank up the power above the FCC mandated 4 Watts RMS to the final amp so they could burn the paint off their car! IDIOTS!!!!! Power is one thing, ground wave is another. The best way to increase the range of CB was to wait until night time and use the skip effect to talk across the country, (of course you had no idea where it would land).
    That said,….did I ever tell you that I HATE CB’s, not because of the radio itself, but because I NEVER, EVER SAW anyone that used one with an IQ over 80. No offence to anyone past present or future, just the way I saw it back in the 70’s 80’s. IE, I lived it!

  90. Meester Squawk, used my last bit of scroll wheel lube and gave it a whirl. The community bucket of scroll wheel lube at the door is empty, Darren never contributes.

  91. I was listening to the governor of Maine being interviewed tonight. He’s a Republican and trying desperately to cut taxes there because they are losing affluent, higher tax paying residents to low tax states at a rapid rate.

    He said Maine and other New England states are all worried because New Hampshire passed Right to Work laws in their last legislature, but the governor there vetoed it. They almost overrode the veto and they are introducing the same bill again at the end of this year. He said if NH goes right to work, there will be an exodus of companies into that state from its neighbors.

  92. One more thing about CB’s back in about 1976-77 Midland had a recall on all of their radios because they said that the radios were putting out more power than the FCC allowed. I have NO IDEA if this was true, BUTT I do know that the shelves at Radio Shack and Gibson’s Discount Center in Brunswick Georgia were clean in less than a day! I’ve always wondered if Midland did this on purpose…..HUMM,…where did I put that “Tin Foil Hat” :wink:

  93. I guess all Democrats still in power are going scorched earth, not that any in GOP leadership or McRomdole will do a damned thing to take advantage of it.

  94. #124: Shamaal, Are those your genuine positions on the subject or is it merely your attempt at humor? This is an honest question. I’ll check for an answer in the am.
    My eyelids need to be checked for holes, and it is gonna take me all night.

  95. Texpat
    ‘C.W.MCall” guy was an insurance salesman or something like that. Heh all the truckers I knew hated him. Rubber duck and all that crap. 4 wheelers would break into “our converstions” wanting to start convoys and crap. Then came Smokey and the Bandit. You would not believe the Burt Reynolds wannabes that wanted to be hired to run ahead to draw off “Smokey”. Good grief.

  96. Super Dave

    did I ever tell you that I HATE CB’s, not because of the radio itself, but because I NEVER, EVER SAW anyone that used one with an IQ over 80.

    AMEN brother……. see my #164

  97. Super Dave
    Yeah I remember that Midland thing. Wasn’t that right before the new expanded model had 40 channels or something over the original 19?

    /My tin foil hat looks better than your tin foil hat. ;)

  98. #149 Darren

    Stoner mharper

    Whew, in context I thought you were accusing me of participating in the 70’s dopery that was being discussed. (Nope, although I have admitted here that I once grew some marijuana plants from seed, but I was studying botany at the time.)

    You wasted your time digging out all that info on metallurgy in South America. I knew that already, and I may have commented on it. But your “gold plates” were supposed to be from New England, right? There were no known trade connections between that area and South or Central America. You are reaching for a connection, but I don’t think you will ever find one.

    I see you have posted more, but it’s too late tonight for me to examine it.

    I hope you understand that it does not bother me at all if you believe in the Mormon gold plates in North America. As ST would say, “I lubs ya anyhoo”.

  99. Texpat (PBUH)

    Anyway, Chip Davis and his partner, Jackson Berkey, went on to fame and fortune as the guys who created the instrumental powerhouse, Mannheim Steamroller. When they shopped their first album to all the major record companies, nobody wanted anything to do with them.

    So they created American Gramaphone which not only housed and played Mannheim Steamroller, they also printed for such “notables” as Checkfield. Checkfield’s claim to fame was some record sales (actually 1 of 4 made #15 on billboard) that were basically snapped up by elevator music creators and commercials. Listen closely and you might remember this little ditty from the +-1990’s commercials.

  100. I’m proud to say that I never owned a CB radio. When folks would ask, “Hey, do you know how to build one of them linear amps?” I’d reply, “It sounds easy enough, but I’m not going to do it.”

  101. mharper;

    But your “gold plates” were supposed to be from New England, right?

    They were found in a hill in upper state New Yourk, correct. Where they were forged or originated in the Americas is not known. The angel Moroni showedthe plates to Joseph Smith and while in mortality Moroni was the last caretaker of the plates. The way the story goes is that Moroni took the vast amounts of records he had and made a summary of them. It is this summary which he kept with him and eventually burried in the Hill Cumorah in New England. Here’s a small account of what happened with the plates in its final days:

    2 For behold, their wars are exceedingly fierce among themselves; and because of theirbhatred they put to death every Nephite that will not deny the Christ.

    3 And I, Moroni, will not deny the Christ; wherefore, I wander whithersoever I can for the safety of mine own life.

    4 Wherefore, I write a few more things, contrary to that which I had supposed; for I had supposed not to have written any more; but I write a few more things, that perhaps they may be of worth unto my brethren, the Lamanites, in some future day, according to the will of the Lord.

    (Moroni 1)

    Moroni wandered about pretty much alone for what could have been at least a couple of decades. That’s a lot of distance he could have travelled in that time. Including travelling from Mesoamerica to modern-day New England.

    There were no known trade connections between that area and South or Central America. You are reaching for a connection, but I don’t think you will ever find one.

    I do not see where that would even be necessary. All we need is one person travelling with golden plates. Over 20 years that one person could easily reach New England from Mesoamerica.

  102. #167 Squawk

    Super Dave
    Yeah I remember that Midland thing. Wasn’t that right before the new expanded model had 40 channels or something over the original 19?

    Yup, You have been there, Thanks for reminding me, I think the problem was not so much the extra power, but the fact that the over powered units would bleed over to other channels, remember, they added channels between the old ones, narrowed the bandwidth. They did the same thing with Aircraft Radios 118.1, 118.2, 118.3 -134.1, 135.9 became 118.05, 118.10, 118.15, 135.975 etc.

  103. #172 bob42

    I’m proud to say that I never owned a CB radio. When folks would ask, “Hey, do you know how to build one of them linear amps?” I’d reply, “It sounds easy enough, but I’m not going to do it.”

    You’ve restored my faith in humanity. :wink:

  104. One more thing for folks like bob and squawk, 135.975 could NOT be accomplished with a crystal, it was done with a SMO, Frequency Synthesizer or Phased Locked Loop, whatever you want to call it. :wink:

  105. 177 SD

    I remember the first synthesized transciever that I built from a kit. It was a Heath (Grief Kit) 2-Meter xcvr with mechanical-digital switches to adjust the frequency between 144 and 148 mhz. This was a big improvement over my Icom xtal controlled rig, but then there were only a handful of 2-meter repeaters in Houston in the 70’s.

    I completed construction and operated it for several weeks until I got a notice from the F.C.C.. It seems that my little jewel was transmitting on the Aircraft Band as well. I could never eliminate the $#$%#$ spurs from the $%$$% radio and ended up tossing it into the trash and bought a slightly better synthesized Henry Radio rig (Tempo) from “Max” at Madison Electronics on Mckinney St.

    I had a First Phone which has gone the way of the Dodo Bird along with the quality of the technicians in the radio biz. The First Phone and Amateur Extra Class exams were tough tests. The Extra Class remains, but the 20 wpm code requirement has also followed the Dodo Bird.

    Simple

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