Hambone

Hambone

Friday Job Reduction Open Comments

Here’s some blasting testimony from someone who knows what he’s talking about, ‘cuz he’s living that regulatory and taxing dream that Obama loves.

I really don’t think I need to elaborate any further.

Share and Enjoy:
  • Print
  • Digg
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • Twitter
  • Google Bookmarks
  • email
  • Google Buzz

 

Both comments and pings are currently closed.

95 Responses to “Friday Job Reduction Open Comments”

  1. GJT says:

    The blog got kilt before it woke up.

    Pole!

  2. timdenchanter says:

    Scot!

    Regarding last night’s debate and in-state tuition for illegals, I’m having trouble getting the difference up to the nearly one hundred thousand dollar level mentioned by some of the suits on stage. Texas A&M charges a difference of $513 per semester credit hour for resident versus non-resident tuition. I’m told 12 hours constitutes a full time student load. Anyone able to convert that into $100k over 4 years?

  3. Super Dave says:

    He was talking about UT, but I’m guessing that it would be ’bout the same as A&M. FWIW; The biggest check that I wrote to A&M was $7976.56 and that was for 15 hours. At that rate a 4 year degree would be about $63800, in state tuition of course.

  4. Tedtam says:

    Of course there are things that move faster than light!

    Jobs from the Obama economy
    Common sense from the current administration (assuming it existed in the first place)
    TBO’s polling numbers
    Weiner’s political future

  5. timdenchanter says:

    The UT rate schedule is a piece of work divided up by college with three different classifications of non-resident. The rates vary from a low of $4,683 for a resident carrying 12 hours to a high of $17,824 for a “new non-resident” with the same load but in a different college. Maybe this is where the $100k figure was born but I shoulda thunk Perry would quote Aggie rates. But then, not much of what Mr. Perry said made sense.

  6. mharper42 says:

    On Drudge: Florida baseball player turns out to be an illegal alien. Comment in the link:

    Does he have a Connecticut Social Security Number?

    :)
    http://www.nbcmiami.com/news/sports/Nunez-Leaves-Marlins-on-Identity-Issue-130401963.html

  7. Shannon says:

    (re: A previous discussion) I heard on the radio that the College Station city council voted to quit adding fluoride to the water. They decided the $42,000 a year they were spending was frivolous expense.

  8. wagonburner says:

    Who was the dim bulb chick to the left of Mr. Schiff? She’s part of the reason we’re in this mess.

  9. Shannon says:

    7
    Yes. He was surprisingly bad in that debate.

  10. Hamous says:

    #9 Shannon

    Everyone knows water fluoridation is a conspiracy created by Alcoa (the world’s largest producer of fluoride waste) to get rid of their waste. The NWO/Bilderberger/Illuminati teamed up with Alcoa and the Prescott Bush/Adolf Hitler cabal because it was discovered that fluoride directly affected the “freedom center” of the human brain:

    Farben had developed plans during the war to fluoridate the occupied countries because it was found that fluoridation caused slight damage to a specific part of the brain, making it more difficult for the person affected to defend his freedom and causing the individual to become more docile towards authority.

    Oh, and Halliburton.

  11. Texpat says:

    Halliburton is run by dentists ?

    In 1960, half the kids in America were getting cavities and getting fillings. Due to the widespread flouridation of the water supply, childhood dental cavities had almost disappeared in the US by the end of the 1980s. Dentists were going broke.

    New technologies and materials saved the profession and now every kid and young adult has some kind of cosmetic treatment, braces, caps, bonding, etc, etc.

    I say it’s a conspiracy among all the Brazos Valley dentists to bring back bad teeth in the new generation.

  12. Hamous says:

    Oh Texpat. They got to you too.

  13. Super Dave says:

    As I mentioned the other day, I was raised on well water and had my share of cavities, but my Daughter was raised here in Webster on MUD district water and got her first cavity when she was 19.

  14. Bonecrusher says:

    #13 Is the reduction in tooth decay due to the fluoride in the water or is it due to the fluoride in the toothpaste and greatly improved dental hygiene practices apart from the contaminated water?

  15. Bonecrusher says:

    #6 TT: from your linkie:

    Neutrinos sent through the ground from Cern toward the Gran Sasso laboratory 732km away in Italy seemed to show up a tiny fraction of a second early.
    /snip
    The team prepares a beam of just one type, muon neutrinos, sending them from Cern to an underground laboratory at Gran Sasso in Italy to see how many show up as a different type, tau neutrinos.

    In the course of doing the experiments, the researchers noticed that the particles showed up 60 billionths of a second sooner than light would over the same distance.

    This is a tiny fractional change, but one that occurs consistently.

    60 billionths of a second faster than the speed of light?? Could one reasonably assume that to be an instrumentation error even if it does occur consistently? How about shooting the neutrinos from the Cern Lab to the east coast of Russia and see if the difference is magnified? It appears to me that the measuring distance is way too short relative to the speed involved. What do you geeky types think of my position?

  16. Hamous says:

    I was raised on well water. I’m now in my 50s and have never had a cavity. Both my sisters had lots of cavities. I always chalked it up to me drinking lots of milk and they didn’t. Now I don’t drink tap water, only beer.

  17. Tedtam says:

    The humble submarine cable makes our current technology possible.

    It’s also amazing to consider that the first trans-Atlantic cables were laid in the 1860s, and trans-Pacific cables followed in the early 1900s. These cables were incredibly low-bandwidth — repeaters didn’t exist yet, so the only way of getting a signal across the pond was by upping the voltage and creating a very noisy link — but by the early 1900s, the British Empire had already connected up most of the continents (see below). It’s also worth noting that the only continent that isn’t wired into the internet is Antarctica; the temperature of the Antarctic Ocean is too low, and the movement of the ice shelf by up to 10 meters per year is tricky to overcome.

    I guess I wouldn’t do well in Antarctica. Or Mars.

    Finally, we would be remiss to ignore geostationary, orbital communications satellites. While satellite data links can be in the gigabit range, the high latency of bouncing a signal through a point that is rather far away (35,000 km, 22,000 miles) makes them unsuitable for many consumer internet services. This same latency will pose some big problems when we start colonizing other planets and need to create an interplanetary (or intergalactic) internet, or galnet for short.

  18. Texpat says:

    I’ve never understood the conventional wisdom that said China would be the driving force to lead the West out of its Great Recession. The notion a nation so utterly dependent on the consumers of America and Europe could “lead” anywhere struck me as counterintuitive and backasswards.

    From the Daily Capitalist:

    Remember when everyone back in 2009 and 2010 was saying that China would lead us out of the recession? Do you recall the lonely voice of the Daily Capitalist saying that it was “we”, the U.S. and EU, who would lead China out of the recession?

    The latest Manufacturing PMI from Markit pops the common myth that we rely on them instead of the other way around.

    First, look at the data:

    Flash PMI survey data, compiled by Markit on behalf of HSBC, signalled another marginal deterioration in Chinese manufacturing sector operating conditions during September. The PMI registered 49.4 compared to 49.9 in August, remaining below the 50.0 no change level for the third successive month. Renewed declines in output and employment, as well as a reduced incidence of delivery delays, exerted a negative influence on the headline PMI reading, which was only prevented from falling further by an uptick in the Stocks of Purchases Index. The PMI data are consistent with industrial production growth easing from an annual rate of 13.5% in August to below 13% in September.

    Check out the charts at the link.

    But don’t tell Thomas Friedman or James Fallows – it might ruin their fantasies.

  19. Hamous says:

    Heh.

    Children’s Health – HEALTH
    Study Finds Tooth Decay Prevalent Among Alaska Native Children

    Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2011/09/23/study-finds-tooth-decay-prevalent-among-alaska-native-children/#ixzz1YmqFcvEr

  20. Shannon says:

    17
    It was the toothpaste. Crest was the first.
    Much of Texas groundwater naturally contains half the amount of fluoride recommended anyway.

  21. wagonburner says:

    Mandrake, do you realize that in addition to fluoridating water, why, there are studies underway to fluoridate salt, flour, fruit juices, soup, sugar, milk, ice cream? Ice cream, Mandrake? Children’s ice cream!…You know when fluoridation first began?…1946. 1946, Mandrake. How does that coincide with your post-war Commie conspiracy, huh? It’s incredibly obvious, isn’t it? A foreign substance is introduced into our precious bodily fluids without the knowledge of the individual. Certainly without any choice. That’s the way a hard-core Commie works.
    – Gen. Jack Ripper

  22. Bonecrusher says:

    SD: Where did yer missus get raised and what is her dental condition? Ifn she has never had a cavity or darned few, it could be that yer daughter got the missuses superior tooth genes.

  23. wagonburner says:

    Now I don’t drink tap water, only beer.

    I never touch the stuff. Don’t you people know what fish do in that stuff?

    btw – Scotch nullifies the “fish activity”.

  24. wagonburner says:

    I-I first became aware of it, Mandrake, during the physical act of love…Yes, a profound sense of fatigue, a feeling of emptiness followed. Luckily I-I was able to interpret these feelings correctly. Loss of essence. I can assure you it has not recurred, Mandrake. Women, er, women sense my power, and they seek the life essence. I do not avoid women, Mandrake. But I do deny them my essence.
    – Gen. Jack Ripper

  25. wagonburner says:

    Obama speechifies in front of a bridge between Cincinnati Ohio and Covington Kentucky as a prime example of a project that would be perfect for Porkulus II. A couple of things might put a damper on his rationale:

    1. The bridge has been scheduled for expansion for several years already
    2. The project is already/only at the “Public Comment” phase
    3. The earliest work could likely start would be in 2015
    4. The work would likely not be completed until 2022
    5. He sez it desperately needs rebuilding, except it is in good shape – it is simply a bottleneck and doesn’t have the traffic capacity needed for current loads

  26. Texpat says:

    The Maasai Tracker

    This is a really great post about individual freedom enabled by capitalism bypassing the impoverishing oppression of leftist, dictatorial governments. I remember reading a while back how getting cellphones had transformed the lives of farmers in west Africa because they set up informal networks to communicate who was paying the best prices for their crops. Prior to that, farmers simply loaded up their produce, went into the nearest city and were at the mercy of whatever the first local broker wanted to pay.

    So there I am near Oldupai (as they call it) in the middle of nowhere hanging around waiting for my ride. The only other person there was George, a very traditional Maasai tracker-guide who was waiting for his party of Germans to go trekking. We are chatting away, talking about his family, my family, what I did, what he did, what his worries were (very serious drought right then) and the like. Then in the middle of our chat his phone goes off and he says to me, I swear, “Excuse me Jeff, I have to take this call.” It just blew me away.

    It took only 7 seven years to flood Africa with phones.

    Great photos at the link, too.

    And note that the author says the Masai tribesmen like Americans much more than Europeans because they tip far better. After observing the way Euros treat most people in third world countries over the years, I suspect they also like Americans because we don’t treat them like inferior peasants.

  27. Bonecrusher says:

    I think mooooooooooooooooooooooochelle the jet thief has finally met her match in the lack of class department.
    Headline:

    How inappropriate! Rihanna wears C-word necklace on visit to Brazilian chapel… and the word isn’t Christ

    The 4 letter c-word on a necklace in a church?!?!
    Click on the linkie and check out her really tasteless attire as well.

  28. Hamous says:

    Much of Texas groundwater naturally contains half the amount of fluoride recommended anyway.

    So Gaia’s in on it too?

  29. wagonburner says:

    Some of the players on the Cincinnati Bungles are apparently closet libertarians.

  30. Super Dave says:

    SD: Where did yer missus get raised and what is her dental condition? Ifn she has never had a cavity or darned few, it could be that yer daughter got the missuses superior tooth genes.

    My wife was raised right across the creek from me, she to was raised on well water. Although I’ve had some cavities, I was blessed with very good teeth and still have all of them except for an extra snaggle tooth that was on top of another one. My wife has “soft teeth” and has had four root canals, daughter has very good teeth son not so much. My daughter takes after me and the boy after his mom. When my daughter was small she looked like my sister and my boy looks a lot like my wife’s oldest brother.

  31. Super Dave says:

    Hambone, “Now I don’t drink tap water, only beer.”
    I resemble that remark :wink:

  32. wagonburner says:

    Lawrence Russell Brewer, who killed James Byrd by dragging him, caused the end of a tradition.

    The world’s a better place without him on it.

  33. Hamous says:

    #30 I don’t think it’s possible to offend the Brazilians. Nowhere else on earth will you find such debauchery. Well, maybe San Francisco.

  34. wagonburner says:

    #36 – You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy.

    Actually, aren’t parts of Bangkok pretty “questionable”?

  35. Bonecrusher says:

    #37 StarWars episode IV (a.k.a the first one to hit the screens) just prior to entering the bar.

  36. wagonburner says:

    (waves hand)
    This is not the blog you’re looking for.

  37. wagonburner says:

    Well alrighty, then. We won’t recognize you back.

  38. mharper42 says:

    #18 Bones

    What do you geeky types think of my position?

    I think the best physics research centers like CERN have had the equipment to accurately measure incredibly small distances and time spans for decades now.

  39. wagonburner says:

    The biggest problem as I see it is that the more accurately you measure something’s velocity (speed, direction), the less you know about where, exactly, it is. The process of measuring something also perturbs it somewhat as well. In the case of a neutrino, which is really tiny, has no charge, very little (if any) mass, and very, very weakly interacts with other matter would seem to make this effect even more pronounced.

    Those CERN guys (and guyettes) are pretty smart, though.

  40. Bonecrusher says:

    re my #18: Dramatically increasing the distance is the rough equivalent of a big increase in sample size for statistics. The bigger the sample the more accurate your answer tends to be.

  41. mharper42 says:

    #45 Bones
    Yeah, we follow that, but CERN is full of genius-level scientists. They know all that.

  42. Simple Simon says:

    37 WB,

    I have seen things at the Soi Cowboy that defy description.

    Simple

  43. Hamous says:

    The inbred morons calling themselves Palestinians are claiming the Israelis are ethnically cleansing? Heh. That’s a good one. Nice that they (and apparently the world media) have forgotten about all the Jews in Muslim countries that were forcibly removed. Enough of this. Kick all “Palestinians” in the West Bank and Gaza into Syria, Jordan, and Egypt. Those are their ancestral homelands anyway.

  44. Bonecrusher says:

    #48 couchmaster: I say the day after they declare statehood, give them one week to clear out, any left will be treated like the cockroaches they are.

  45. Simple Simon says:

    45
    At 300,000 meters/per second (speed of light) is the increase from 17 kilometers (length of Large Hadron Accelerator at Cern) to a couple of thousand kilometers that significant.

    This is not the first time that “faster than light” particles with rest masses greater than zero have been found. The inherent inaccuracy of the whole system makes such a measurement possible, but if true it would be a show stopper.

    Simple

  46. Bonecrusher says:

    #50 Simple: I think you may have left a couple of key words out of your first paragraph. My position is that, due to the inherent inaccuracy of the instruments and the relatively short distance from Cern to the spot in Italy (723 kilometers), a big increase in the distance will reduce the instrument inaccuracy factor. 60 billionths of a second is such a short space of time that, IMHO, the instrumentation limits significantly reduce the confidence of the “earth shattering” results.

  47. Bonecrusher says:

    from the inbox:

    From the Round Pen

    Trapped

    I finished feedin’ one mornin’ and was enjoyin’ the muffled sounds of the horses as they fed on the sweetfeed in their troughs when a thought crossed my mind. So while the horses finished eatin’, I slipped down the alley and opened up a trail to the open pasture beyond the pens. I’ve fed these horses, I’ve groomed these animals, I’ve been their veterinarian, I’ve been the supplier of all their needs so I kinda got a handle on their personalities and if you don’t think a horse has a personality, you just never been around one. There’s one who thinks he’s a lady’s man and must be kept in a pen to himself. There are two mares that can’t handle competition so they too must be kept in separate pens. Then there are three that get along well enough to keep penned together and then there are two mares that just need special attention and lovin’.
    By the time I got all the gates opened and closed that needed to be, and made my way back to their pens, they had just finished so I opened up the first gate and let the two stall mates out. First, they nosed their way through the gate as if to ask permission to go through the gate. Then seein’ I wasn’t gonna make a move to keep ‘em in and I hadn’t squalled at ‘em they eagerly went into the open alley and then began to trot unrestricted toward the pasture.
    The trot changed into a canter and then into a full run as they sensed they were free. After they quit runnin’ around the small trap of a pasture and quit nickerin’ to the other horses, they dropped their heads and began to look for something to eat. (We’ve been in a drought for so long, the asphalt highway has more grass than this pasture.) I climbed a fence and sat there watchin’ them for another thirty minutes or so until I finally heard all I believe Adonai was tryin’ to tell me.
    When a man is trapped, like these horses, the fire will go out of him and he becomes a different individual. He wasn’t created to be penned up with no freedom of movement, or expression. He was created to challenge his environment to dominate it and to rule it. After bein’ penned up for so long, the man that see’s an open gate will at first seek permission to go through it if he’s not been penned up for too long. Next, when he see’s an open road leading out to new pasture, his heart rate will increase and his speed of travel will increase and he begins to feel like a man should feel like.
    We as a society, have for far too long been penned up and trapped in an environment of our own makin’. We have purchased so much, that our possessions that make us feel good about ourselves, now possess and own us and we must work even harder to keep them in our possession. In our efforts to keep up with our neighbors, we now live in homes we’re proud of but wouldn’t dare share with our neighbors, friends, or family because we’re tryin’ real hard workin’ overtime just to pay the mortgage, insurance and taxes. We don’t have time to visit with one another. We have become mean spirited and like these horses, we are penned, but unlike these horses we penned ourselves according to our personalities and it has made us hard to get along with.
    Yahshua ( Jesus ) sent the disciples out two by two without so much as a change of clothes. Why do you think we need so much stuff in our lives? All we need, to be who and what were created to be, is faith that Elohim will provide all our needs. When we begin to live a life of faith, knowin’ He’s the one that feeds and waters us, etc., we are set free from the pens of this life and we begin to be human again. Are you willin’ to be who you were created to be? If so, nose through the gate, stop chasin’ after the things that don’t enrich your life and start chasin’ after Elhoim. You’ve heard His voice, now – it’s all up to you on how you’re gonna respond.

    Greg Crawford
    http://www.covenantranch.org
    Covenant Ranch Ministry
    325.737.2597 /713.408.8805 cell
    for confidential prayer requests: pleasepray@jesusanswers.com
    © Greg Crawford, 2011

    In His Majesty’s Service,
    Greg Crawford
    “Aude aliquid dignum” (Dare Something Worthy)

  48. wagonburner says:

    If you were to fire the neutrino stream straight down and measure when they emerge from the ground at the antipodal point to CERN, you would get the maximum separation (thus maximum baseline distance). By doing this, you then run into the difficulty of ensuring the clocks are sufficiently synchronized to allow measurements with such tight tolerance.

    The Earth is approx 13,000km in diameter. Light takes about 43ms to travel that far (speed of light is 300,000km/sec). The difference the CERN guys measured was 60ns over a time of about 2.4ms. Assuming a linear proportionality, you would expect a difference of about 1,100 ns (1.1 microseconds) through the whole planet. I don’t know how difficult it would be to synchronize clocks sufficiently across that distance to be able to detect a difference down to a few nanoseconds.

  49. texanadian says:

    To much math… how about some Will Rogers.

    “Never squat while wearing your spurs”
    Will Rogers, who died in a 1935 plane crash, was one of the
    greatest political sages this country has ever known.

    Enjoy the following:
    .
    1. Never slap a man who’s chewing tobacco.

    2. Never kick a cow chip on a hot day.

    3. There are two theories to arguing with a woman.
    Neither works.

    4. Never miss a good chance to shut up.

    5. Always drink upstream from the herd.

    6. If you find yourself in a hole, stop digging.

    7. The quickest way to double your money is to fold it
    and put it back into your pocket.

    8. There are three kinds of men:
    The ones that learn by reading
    The few who learn by observation
    The rest of them have to pee on the electric fence and find out for themselves.

    9. Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

    10. If you’re ridin’ ahead of the herd, take a look back every now and then
    to make sure it’s still there.

    11. Lettin’ the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier’n puttin’ it back.

    12. After eating an entire bull, a mountain lion felt so good he started roaring.
    He kept it up until a hunter came along and shot him.
    The moral: When you’re full of bull, keep your mouth shut.

  50. wagonburner says:

    The quickest way to double your money is to fold it
    and put it back into your pocket.

    The wagonburner’s corollary:
    The most reliable way to make a small fortune in commodities is to start with a large fortune.

    Lettin’ the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier’n puttin’ it back.

    Samples’ corollary:
    There’s more’n one way to skin a cat, but they tend to be pretty riled up by the third or fourth try.

  51. mharper42 says:

    85 Katfish says:
    September 23, 2011 at 12:47 am
    #76 – I would never question HEBs generosity………………..but for Gawdsakes their stores were laid out by Stevie Wonder!! :) (‘s’ why I won’t shop there)

    I shopped HEB quite happily when I lived in Corpus a long time ago. Never lived close to any HEB in Houston until current home. It was a ghetto HEB and I only went there one time, soon after we bought this house 15 yrs ago. The whole store smelled like sour milk. It had a stench that seemed to be soaked into the floor, walls, ceilings and fixtures. Gar!

  52. Tedtam says:

    #56 Mharper

    I shopped HEB quite happily when I lived in Corpus a long time ago. Never lived close to any HEB in Houston until current home. It was a ghetto HEB and I only went there one time, soon after we bought this house 15 yrs ago. The whole store smelled like sour milk.

    For me, it was the local Fiesta. I won’t shop in any store where I can smell the meat department from the front door.

  53. Shannon says:

    I won’t shop in any store where I can smell the meat department from the front door

    Amen

  54. Shannon says:

    The HEB in Brenham is okay. It’s an older store (without the stupid diagonal design).
    It beats going to Walmart, any day.

  55. Sarge says:

    The HEB in Brenham is okay. It’s an older store (without the stupid diagonal design).

    I can attest to the fact that HEB Stores have a new design. Did one in Pearsall earlier this year. Got a near clone going to Gonzales on my desk now.

    Another squad is working on the “HEB of the Future” going summers in Santone.

    HEB been veddy veddy good to me.

  56. Shannon says:

    Sarge
    Are they sticking with that ridiculous aisle configuration, or do you only see structural plans?

  57. Sarge says:

    From what I can see, the one in Gonzalez is laid out like the Katy Kroger on Grand Parkway, and similar to the HEB in Richmond at Grand Parkway and 59.

  58. Shannon says:

    I understand the retailing theory behind the squirrelly aisle configuration, but they need to do some research on the “Katfish Syndrome”. I think they would be surprised at how many people refuse to shop in the stores with that design. Those West side HEBs are magnificent, but I’m with Katfish. I won’t put up with it. I’ll go down the street to a higher priced store to avoid it.

  59. Texpat says:

    I sure do miss this guy.

  60. Sarge says:

    Magnum opus, fer sure

  61. Sarge says:

    BTW—Saw Willis Allan Ramsey at the Mucky Duck a couple months ago, Shake Russel last month, and Junior Brown weekend before last.

  62. Texpat says:

    Willis Allan Ramsey was my favorite songwriter back in the golden days of Texas music. He hooked up with Leon Russell, who ripped him off and burned him badly. Ramsey retreated back to East Texas and nobody heard from him for many years. I was really glad to see him step back into the spotlight.

  63. Sarge says:

    He actually spoke warmly of Leon. Sang a song he wrote with him about some fishing place he owned in Arkansas. Lives in Colorado now, I think. His wife was the opening act.

    Let’s just say that it was the kind of act that a doting husband would let a wife who is a lot less talented than she thinks she is do.

    If I hadn’t wanted to hear Angel Eyes and Northeast Texas Women, I’d have walked out after finishing the Shepperd’s Pie.

    No Muskrat Love, though. I understand he refuses to do it after the Captain and Tenille turned it into a “pop classic.”

  64. Texpat says:

    Back in about 1974-75, I knew a girl who was close friends with Townes. She called me up and said he was playing at the Old Quarter so let’s go down to see him.

    We’ve got a table near the mike and Townes is late, as usual, and well on his way to being drunk. He plays a great first set, though, and immediately calls for a pitcher of beer from the waitress.

    My friend, Bitsy, and I get up to walk over to Van Zandt just as the waitress hands him a full pitcher of beer. Bitsy introduces me and Townes and he picked that moment to lose his balance, fall towards me and dump the entire pitcher of beer down my front.

    Needless to say, it was a memorable night. Townes did manage to make it through a long second set in spite of his condition.

  65. mharper42 says:

    I don’t quite follow the aisle/zigzag comments about new HEB stores. I haven’t been in a new one and the old ghetto store was shut down long ago. The building belongs to Harris County probation services the last 5-6 years. I think I was in the building for a city council district meeting or some such 4-5 years ago and it was unrecognizable inside.

  66. Hamous says:

    Texpat – I know a lady named Bitsy. I wonder if it could be the same one.

  67. Darren says:

    I really don’t think I need to elaborate any further.

    But now that the video’s been removed, you got a lot of elaboration to do. :)

  68. Texpat says:

    #71 Hamous

    Uh, I’ve answered this one in a private email to you.

    I can’t change the names to protect the innocent because there weren’t any innocents – we were all guilty as hell.

  69. Darren says:

    I don’t think it’s possible to offend the Brazilians.

    Sure you can. When at their house, just say that you don’t like their food. You’ll get an automatic disinvite to ever enter into their house again. Now, skankiness at a church, that’s another story.

  70. Darren says:

    You will never find a more wretched hive of scum and villainy.

    StarWars episode IV (a.k.a the first one to hit the screens) just prior to entering the bar.

    Yup, as well as, “you must be cautious”.

  71. Shannon says:

    66
    Green eyed monster, here.

  72. Shannon says:

    70′mharp
    You’re just going to have to take our word for it. It’s the grocery store design from he||.
    Mharp might never find her way out of there.

  73. Darren says:

    Nearly 700,000 Tennesseans will gain new coverage under health-care reform, but those already with insurance might have to wait longer to receive care and younger people overall may have to pay more.

    Those are among findings from a report out from a think tank the state’s largest health insurer, BlueCross BlueShield of Tennessee, launched this year to study the interface between public policy and health care.

    That’s happened everywhere else in the world that has tried the sort of scheme Obamacare folows, so why would we be exempt from experiencing the same results?

    Patients to wait longer for care under new health law, think tank says

  74. Darren says:

    mharper;

    I don’t quite follow the aisle/zigzag comments about new HEB stores.

    I shop at HEB all the time though it’s a small store, not a superstore which might make a difference to shoppers. Though from time to time I make my way to an HEB superstore and really did not mind shopping there.

  75. GJT says:

    #77

    Aww, yall just gotta just grin and bear it, make your way to the fabulous meat selections or specials on crawfish or king crab legs, make it through each aisle to get free samples of all kinda good grub and get to the bread section where you find the only fresh Texas Toast in town and then figure out how to get to the check out lines and yer good. :D

  76. mharper42 says:

    #77 Shannon

    Mharp might never find her way out of there.

    Bet Iron Mary Cash would — or just bust her way out through the floral department.

  77. mharper42 says:

    really did not mind shopping there.

    Darren, please do not misunderstand. I was not denigrating HEB overall, just one run-down store that has since closed up shop since my one experience with it 15 years ago. All that other stuff about new store layouts was news to me.

  78. GJT says:

    So was Rick Perry’s no heart statement his Howard Dean moment?

  79. phil says:

    King Obumma asks his faithful sheepers DYLM then tells them to help him pass his gobs of jobs bill.

  80. gtotracker says:

    This is an interesting view on the GM-UAW deal. I usually consider this site a joke but they should have the inside track on this one.

    http://www.wsws.org/articles/2011/sep2011/auto-s23.shtml

  81. Simple Simon says:

    WB,

    Thanks for correcting my math. I am embarassed and will break my slide rule across my knee in shame. Normally, I would express C as 3.0EE8 meters/sec. Using m instead of km is how one overshoots a Mars landing.

    I was posting at the same time I was listening to the world’s most boring teleconference. I should have known. I am too old to multi-task. (i.e. sleep and post)

    Simple

  82. Shannon says:

    83
    No, his Howard Dean moment was when he stuttered thru a lame attempt at humor while trying to nail Romney for flip flops.
    And even that doesn’t qualify as a HD moment.
    But you get the feeling there’s one just around the corner.
    He’s really sucked in these debates, but then, I’ve never liked the guy, so my opinion is shaded.

    Bettencourt says Palin will be in by the end of the month.

    I’m beginning to get this sick feeling that the R’s really are going to figure out a way to lose to the worst incumbent in history.

  83. GJT says:

    #87

    I don’t know, I didn’t see the debate but the more I hear the You Have No Heart replay, the madder I get. Bush got away with Campassionant Conservatism but I don’t think it would play again.

  84. Texpat says:

    I would give one helluva lot to have an HEB in my neighborhood. I don’t care how they run the aisles.

    You complainers down there are a bunch of spoiled sissies.

    You cannot believe what passes for a supermarket around here. They are the worst I have ever seen anywhere in America.

    In fact, that applies to just about any retail business you can imagine – from gas stations to department stores to drugstores. Most people in Texas have no clue they are the so lucky to have the best run retail outlets, probably in the world.

  85. Darren says:

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu delivered a rousing and passionate speech to the U.N. General Assembly on Friday. Not only did he say that every member should have walked out on Ahmadinejad after he suggested 9/11 was an American conspiracy, but he also laid out why the peace process hasn’t worked — mainly because the Palestinians have sabotaged it — and worked in criticism of the United Nations in general.

    Netanyahu Slams U.N. as ‘Theater of the Absurd’

    Netanyahu is a man who knows the international issues and knows how to address them. Funny how in the first video that one ofthe Jordanian delagates seemed to have a headache during Natenyahu’s speech.

  86. Darren says:

    mharper #82;

    I was not denigrating HEB overall, just one run-down store that has since closed up shop since my one experience with it 15 years ago.

    Actually I interpreted your post as defending HEB. I was backing you up.

    I got your back, mharper. :)

  87. Darren says:

    You cannot believe what passes for a supermarket around here. They are the worst I have ever seen anywhere in America.

    Yup, outside America you’ll come across pigs hanging outside covered with flies. I’ve seen it myself. I never bought meat from such a place but I ate in many people’s homes and no doubt that they bought their meat from such places. Just made sure the meat was well cooked.

  88. GJT says:

    You complainers down there are a bunch of spoiled sissies

    I got one of those little brothers too.

  89. Darren says:

    Shannon;

    I’m beginning to get this sick feeling that the R’s really are going to figure out a way to lose to the worst incumbent in history.

    That could happen but Perry or Romney would defeat Obama. Even in their low moments (Romney didn’t do particularly well neither in the last debate) they’d outshine Obama in any debate. In my opinion that’s especially true for Romney.

  90. Texpat says:

    #93 GJT

    Heh.