Monday Open Comments


Texpat forwarded this article approaching the subject of gun control from a different perspective than usual:

Bolsheviks and Nazis alike practiced collective punishment. The Reds would take hostages against “good behavior” of residents of a town and shoot them if any resistance was offered. Nazis would sometimes kill everyone in a town near which one of their troops perished. We look at such practices with abhorrence, though US and Allied bombings probably killed a few innocent bystanders of their own. As a culture, we don’t view collective punishments as acceptable…or do we?

When one insane man in the UK murdered a group of kids in 1987, hundreds of thousands were punished for his sins. British gun owners were deprived of their guns and not given a choice about it. That was collective punishment in its pure form, affecting only people who had no connection to the crime at all.

I particularly like the last paragraph. Hard hitting, but no less true:

And, in the end, our guns merely hold gun control pushers at bay. The victory over that unethical ideology will come from the cultural rejection of collective punishment. In my lifetime, Brady creatures and their ideological allies will be viewed with the same derision as the Ku Klux Klan.

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93 Responses to “Monday Open Comments”

  1. 1
    Super Dave says:

    What a cool Pistol, I always liked the Broom Handle Mauser.
    Mornin’ Gang!

  2. 2
    mharper42 says:

    Brady creatures and their ideological allies will be viewed with the same derision as the Ku Klux Klan.

    We can hope so. But gun control is yet another area where the US population is close to evenly divided. Soccer moms hate guns.

  3. 3
    Lawrence says:

    “Soccer moms hate guns.”

    I interpret that to mean that you hate guns.

    I would strongly disagree with your statement – I’m not sure where you came up with that idea, but I would contend it’s wwwwaaaaaayyyyyy off base.

  4. 4
    wagonburner says:

    Why is it that a bunch of “anarchists” seems to always appear during every big lefty rally/protest? Aren’t the big-government lefty and “anarchists” on different sides? One wants huge government and the other wants no government.

    Furthermore, why is it that these “anarchists” seem to be mostly disaffected “students” b!tching about increases in tuition or cuts to “ethnic/womens studies”?

  5. 5
    wagonburner says:

    Soccer moms in the northeast and on the west coast hate guns.

    Many soccer moms in Texas can shoot the [posterior orifice] out of a rat at 50 yards with a .45.

  6. 6
    Bonecrusher says:

    The first thing a tyrant does when he takes over is to remove peoples means of self defense. The message that guns kill people has been pounded into our heads for decades – it was not true then and it is not now. The pro 2nd Amendment types have been out gunned in the battle for the minds of America.
    Blaming a gun for a murder is the equivalent of blaming a pencil for a misspelled word.

    I really like the quote in the picture:

    I will not be held responsible for misdeeds committed by people who look like me. . . .

    This is the approach that should be taken for race relations/reparations.

  7. 7
    wagonburner says:

    One of the big problems Obama and his “economic” team have with measurement is that vanishingly few of them have any feel at all for the economic situation of those at the other end of the economic spectrum.

    “Today you can buy an iPad 2 that costs the same as an iPad 1 that is twice as powerful,” [William Dudley, president of the New York Federal Reserve] replied. “You have to look at the prices of all things.”
    .
    To which one truly great American responded: “I can’t eat an iPad.” He might as well have added, “I can’t drive an iPad to work either.” And at the rate grocery and gas prices are rising, by the end of this year, I couldn’t afford that iPad’s monthly service fee even if I had enough discretionary income to purchase the little piece of dazzling technology in the first place.

    This is parttly cluelessness, partly because food & energy are typically excluded in the measure of “core inflation” because they tend to be volatile. At some point, however, they need to keep in mind that it is entirely possible, even likely that these volatile commodities could also be trending upward, steeply, in value.

  8. 8
    El Gordo says:

    I’m bringing this one forward from last night because I know that you are all concerned about how much the Japanese nuke problem is directly affecting you activities here and now.

    Here’s a series of handy charts explaining radiation doses from various sources and how much risk you generally expose yourself to by eating bananas. The banana formula is actually pretty handy.

    http://xkcd.com/radiation/
    Check out the Banana Equivalent Dose here:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banana_equivalent_dose

  9. 9
    Hamous says:

    Lowrents – I think MHarper was speaking about women in general tend to support gun control at higher levels than men.

    By contrast, 60% of women say it is more important to control gun ownership, while 33% see protecting gun rights as more important. In April 2008, 64% of women said controlling gun ownership was more important compared with 30% who placed greater importance on protecting the right to own guns.

    But here’s the real problem:

    As might be expected, people who say they have guns in their home are much more supportive of gun rights than are those who do not own guns.

    I suspect that the number of people who don’t own guns is growing.

  10. 10
  11. 11
    fat albert says:

    This just in:

    Newt’s running……..

  12. 12
    wagonburner says:

    #11 fa
    yawn

  13. 13
    OletimerLin says:

    G’Morning all

    Talk about gun control will stir things up every time.
    Here are the latest stats on gun control as of January, 2011

    Overall gun control
    54% less
    44% more

    This is a dramatic decrease of
    19% less
    78% more
    since 1990

    http://sas-origin.onstreammedia.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/y1alhpsknkg1ntbd3cdklg.gif

    ban handguns
    71% no
    29% yes

    This is a dramatic decrease of
    29% no
    60% yes
    since 1990

    http://sas-origin.onstreammedia.com/origin/gallupinc/GallupSpaces/Production/Cms/POLL/8hvydp_fg0sg7cwhhwa3_q.gif

  14. 14
    Lawrence says:

    “I suspect that the number of people who don’t own guns is growing.”

    Hammie, you might check gun sales since the last presidential election.

    I believe just the opposite.

  15. 15
    OletimerLin says:

    Stumbled upon this blog last night (blind hog syndrome)

    Comparison of Three Navy Ships all Named After a US President

    USS REAGAN
    USS William Jefferson Clinton
    USS BARACK OBAMA

    http://www.sodahead.com/united-states/comparison-of-three-navy-ships-all-named-after-a-us-president/blog-95325/?page=3

  16. 16
    Super Dave says:

    OletimerLin, About your second chart, it scares the crap outta’ me that 29% think handguns should be banned! That said, the trend to more common sense is very good, people are getting themselves educated about guns in general. I’d say the Lame Stream Media’s strangle hold on all media matters is evaporating due to the internet, Fox etc.

  17. 17
    OletimerLin says:

    BTW
    A good website for gun owners. Manuals in downloadable PDF for “almost” every gun on Earth.

    http://stevespages.com/page7b.htm

  18. 18
    Super Dave says:

    #14 Lawrence

    “I suspect that the number of people who don’t own guns is growing.”
    Hammie, you might check gun sales since the last presidential election.

    I believe just the opposite.

    I think you’re right, with 40 “Right to Carry” states and the fact that a lot of women are now arming themselves, many who may not have ever fired a weapon before deciding that they needed to take care of themselves.

  19. 19
    OletimerLin says:

    OletimerLin, About your second chart, it scares the crap outta’ me that 29% think handguns should be banned!

    Rember the 90-10 rule, 10% of disinters on any issue will never change. That leaves only 19% of the public in the negative and with facts and education, they can change.

  20. 20
    Katfish says:

    WOW! Amazing hand eye coordination!

    PingPong @ Warp 10!!!

  21. 21
    OletimerLin says:

    “We will be there only a few days or a couple of weeks.”

    US officials: Libyan operation could last months
    Mar 27
    By BRADLEY KLAPPER

    WASHINGTON (AP) – U.S.-led military action in Libya has bolstered rebels fighting Moammar Gadhafi’s forces, but the international operation could continue for months, the Obama administration says.

    Ahead of President Barack Obama’s national address Monday to explain his decision to act against the Libyan leader, Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said in appearances on the Sunday talk shows that the intervention had effectively rendered Gadhafi’s forces defenseless against air attacks and created the conditions for opposition advances westward.

    snip

    NATO’s top decision-making body was to meet Sunday to expand its enforcement of the no-fly zone to include air strikes against Libyan ground targets.

    snip

    But asked on ABC’s “This Week” if that would mean a U.S. military commitment until year’s end, Gates said, “I don’t think anybody knows the answer to that.”

    The lack of clarity on that question reflects a worry for lawmakers clamoring to hear fuller explanations from the administration on why the U.S. was embroiling itself in another Muslim conflict and what the ultimate goals of the intervention are.

    http://apnews.myway.com/article/20110327/D9M7JGB00.html

  22. 22
    mharper42 says:

    #3 Lawrencio

    Are you insane? I’m not a soccer mom. I have been a card-carrying member of the NRA.

  23. 23
    Super Dave says:

    Well or Panama City Beach Brawler has been charged with a Felony;

    Smith was caught on a cell phone video as she climbed onto the restaurant’s counter, threw items and struck employees March 19. She damaged one of the restaurant’s $3,800 LED screens and a cash register, authorities said.

    A $3800 LED screen?!?! Dang, FWIW; This happened in Hambone’s state, but she was from Montgomery Alabama. PC Beach is my summer stomping grounds.

  24. 24
    Katfish says:

    #23 – DANGGGGGGGGGGGGGGG – wonder if MickeyD’s er I mean Burglar King is charging extra for the show?

  25. 25
    Super Dave says:

    Talk about sick! New Jersey Woman Accused Of Dumping Dog Down Trash Chute.
    Warning, graphic picture.

  26. 26
    wagonburner says:

    Problems caused by excessive government are really starting to come home to roost.

    [Former Rep. Tony Hall (D-Ohio), the head of the Alliance to End Hunger] told The Hill that conditions for the world’s poor are worse now, given worldwide food price inflation. [emph. mine]

    This was a point made in a link I posted above.

    The antics of Kimesa Smith in PCB, Hamousistan recently present us with an object lesson in why the dissolution of the American family is such a critical issue. Miss Smith, who is a 30 year-old unemployed mother of at least 4 decided Burger King didn’t let her have her way, so she went nuts, destroying a Burger King in the process. Many of the patrons decided to join in as well. She said that she stopped at the Burger King to get something in her stomach in preparation for a night of drinking. She did not say who would be caring for her children while she would be thusly occupied.

    If the Democrats and wobbly Republicans in DC would cut people like Miss Smith off from all forms of welfare and make her find and keep a job, she might go from a tax sink to a tax source. If she won’t find a job, then let her get hungry enough to get some of the right kind of motivation. I get sick of paying for people like her to act like a bunch of uncivilized barbarians who feel some sort of entitlement to my labor. If we stopped paying for these idiots, we’d have a lot fewer fiscal problems in this country.

  27. 27
    Katfish says:

    #25 – Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr – wissin oxygen THIEF!

  28. 28
    Tedtam says:

    Well, happy Monday morning to everyone! I see the gang is off and running.

    The retreat on Saturday went well, especially since one mother brought her daughter in and warned us that two other girls had threatened to beat her up. What did Girl#1 do to the others? She broke up with her boyfriend. The boyfriend was a friend – not brother, cousin or other relative – of bully#1 or bully#2. Unreal. We handled it. The girls were put into separate small discussion groups. In our “large group” sessions, where we shared what we learned in the small group discussions, the topic of anger management came up. As I was talking about forgiveness and the damage that carrying anger does to us, I could see B1 and B2 rolling eyes, sighing heavily, and writing notes to each other. I’m sure they thought I was directing it at them, which was true – they were part of the group, and I was talking to the group.

    There were three rounds to the retreat : What do I want? What does God want for me? and Do I seek His guidance? Each round has individual meditation on one of four Scripture readings (we had four groups), then small group discussion, then large group sharing. The goal of the day is to find out if what they want for themselves is compatible with what a loving Father wants for them, and then to see if they seek His guidance when those two things are not compatible. They are supposed to dig deep to see what their relationship with God is, and what they want it to be. The important thing is that the student does the driving; I emphasize very clearly to my facilitators that the adults do not tell the students how they SHOULD feel, only help them to understand how they DO feel.

    By the end of the day, when I had individual prayer with each student, I was really touched. One girl came to me for prayer and admitted that her faith had been in serious doubt. Her comment was “I am so glad I came today. So many of my questions have been answered!” She answered her own questions by reading His word and delving into her own soul, but I just smiled and said “I’m so glad you came!”

    One heartbreaking prayer request came from one of my male students. It seems his uncle is being held hostage in Mexico. Another girl has an alcoholic father, another’s father was just diagnosed with diabetes. There was the myriad of family trust issues and concerns for grades that I hear every year. I really treasure those one-on-one moments with my students, for it’s then that I am able to see their hearts and through prayer introduce them to a God who loves them.

    I come home tired, but fulfilled.

    Then yesterday, I mowed grass until I thought I’d puke and had to stop.

    That was my weekend!

  29. 29
    Adee says:

    Good morning Hamsters. Cool front came through late yesterday and blessed us with 60 at 6. Overcast is holding it to 64 at 10:30. In the pastures some of the small, youngling native pecans are leafing out; the mature ones seem willing sometime soon; the ancient ones disagree and hold fast to their buds. We have learned to observe the ancient ones in the matter of late frosts/true arrival of Spring.

    Great opening article, Texpat and Hamous.

  30. 30
    Super Dave says:

    #26 wagonburner Racist.

  31. 31
    Shannon says:

    THOSE who denounce critics of Islam should allow that, like all global faiths, Islam has its detractors and a religion will be judged on what its followers say and do.

    There is a debate going on about Islam. The question being asked is: Does Islam itself – not just poverty or social exclusion – provide ideological fuel for extremism and violence?

    It is all too tempting to promote one-dimensional explanations of religious violence. Monash University doctoral candidate Rachel Woodlock said on this page on Wednesday that social exclusion was the root of Islamic radicalism.

    On one hand, there are those who, like Woodlock, demand that critics of Islam be stigmatised as ignorant, right-wing racists. On the other hand, Islam’s problems cannot be simplistically reduced to social or economic factors.

    Violence in the name of Islam is well-attested in nations in which Muslims are dominant, and it is non-Muslim minorities that suffer the exclusion. It does not do to argue that religion has no relevance to such events………

    Mark Durie is an Anglican vicar in Australia.

    Read the rest of his piece at markdurie.blogspot.com

  32. 32
    wagonburner says:

    #30 dave
    sez you

  33. 33
    wagonburner says:

    We now know what the difference between Libya and Syria is.

    Clinton said the elements that led to intervention in Libya — international condemnation, an Arab League call for action, a United Nations Security Council resolution — are “not going to happen” with Syria, in part because members of the U.S. Congress from both parties say they believe Assad is “a reformer.”

    Did they cut off the air supply to Congress? Those people have brain damage.

    Assad has been killing people who disagree with him for years. He’s as reform-minded as Uday, Qusay, and Umbassday Hussein in Iraq would have been. Syria is also directly responsible for all kinds of havoc in the Middle East, especially Lebanon and Northern Israel.

  34. 34
    bob42 says:

    Dang it. The Onion beat me to another one.

    Even Newt Gingrich A Little Depressed By Prospect Of Him Running For President

    While confirming his ardent desire to be president, the former Speaker of the House told reporters the mere fact that American voters were seriously considering Newt Gingrich to be a viable Republican candidate in 2012 was a fairly distressing development that made him question the direction the country was moving in.

    “Even when I see my name on a list of potential candidates, I think, you gotta be kidding me—Newt Gingrich?

  35. 35
    Super Dave says:

    PCB BK Brawler Told Cops A Real Whopper
    Hey, she lives in Westgate, that is where my parents were living when I was born. It was a tract home comunity just outside of Maxwell AFB, built after the war. My folk’s house was a 800 square foot 2 bedroom 1 bath house. No AC of course.

  36. 36
    wagonburner says:

    Victor Davis Hanson delivers another well-aimed kick to Obama’s bawls.

  37. 37
    Sarge says:

    Shannom;

    In read the blog post in your #31 and I appreciate its perspective.

    Allow me to invite you to read two short treatises published in Small Wars Journal:

    Discussions on the Complexity of
    Diverse Sunni Islamic Interpretations:
    History and Islamic Argumentation al-Qaida Chooses to Neglectby CDR Youssef Aboul-Enein, MSC, USN
    Foreword by Dr. Steve Randolph, Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Industrial College of the Armed Forces Washington D.C.

    The best antidote to marginalize al-Qaida’s narratives is the use of Islam and Islamic history, particularly identifying what are Bin Laden’s and Zawahiri’s delusions that are given a veneer of legitimacy using fragments of Islam. Al-Qaida is proficient in creating and spinning narratives in order to justify its worldview, operations, and narrow theology. It is not enough to say al-Qaida hijacked Islam; Muslims in particular, and non-Muslims when possible, must
    explain how al-Qaida has done so through the narrowness and selectivity of its interpretations of Islam.

    Another, older interpretation can be found here.

    JIHAD, WAR, AND TERRORISMGeorge W. Gawrych
    U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

    Studying Islam presents an intellectual challenge to Americans.ii Muslims generally regard unity of politics and religion as the ideal and, therefore, mix faith and war together. American political tradition, on the other hand, enshrines the clear separation of church and state. Americans are by nature skeptical of religion intruding into politics. Calls to Jihad, thus, invoke images of religious fanaticism and extremism. Such a view is dead wrong. In fact, the religion of Islam contains strong moral and ethical principles on Jihad and the conduct of war, and there is a strong tradition against killing innocent people. Radical Islam, however, generally preaches total war against its opposition and therefore condones the killing of some civilians as part of Jihad.

    A somewhat longer investigation from the Australian perspective that differs somewhat from the gentleman you linked to can be found here. H/T to SWJ for this one as well.

    Joining the caravan? The Middle East, Islamism and Indonesia
    Anthony Bubalo

    Summary
    September 11 2001 and the Bali Bombing in November 2002 evoked images of a militant Islamist wave sweeping the globe from the Middle East, radicalising once peaceful Muslim communities around the world. A new Lowy Institute Paper by Anthony Bubalo and Greg Fealy critically examines the truth of this perception by exploring the impact a number of Islamist and ‘neo-fundamentalist’ currents from the Middle East have had in Indonesia.

    Perhaps examining the military perspectives on the conduct of the war we find ourselves fighting might allow folks to better understand where I’m coming from.

  38. 38
    Sarge says:

    Obama’s Foreign Policy in the Middle East can be summed up rather succinctly. I call it the Three Bears approach.

    Syria has no oil.

    Iran has too much.

    Libya is juuuuuust right.

  39. 39
    Shannon says:

    37 Sarge
    Okay. It’ll have to wait until I’m at home on the PC.

  40. 40
  41. 41
    wagonburner says:

    The leadership in Iran is practically giddy over the turmoil in the Middle East. And not just because they are involved with a good chunk of it.

    The worrying part of this is that since they think the 12th imam is coming sooner than they originally thought, what’s to stop them from speeding things up even more?

  42. 42
  43. 43
    wagonburner says:

    Who can even keep up with all the nutters with all their different dates?

  44. 44
    Sarge says:

    39 Shannon says:
    March 28, 2011 at 1:48 pm
    37 Sarge
    Okay. It’ll have to wait until I’m at home on the PC.

    Allow me to make a comment on sources.

    I hope folks will forgive me the habit of relying on military scholarship as it regards an assessment of Islam. I personally feel that the professional Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, and Airmen who write these hard to find papers meant to inform thier peers at the Command and Tactical levels do so fully cognizant of the fact that if they get it wrong, American boys and girls will die. I feel that provides them with both a moral and professional imperative to get it right that is absent in blog posts and news articles, most of which are generally written from a personal, political, or (in this case) religious bias—even those that emanate from what small, closed disussion groups call “the smartest guy I know.” The worst that can happen from an individual blog post is that somebody gets flamed or gossipped about behind thier back by people who do not rely on the same sources of information.

    I do have more if you want.

    For a general discussion of the subject of this special kind of warfare allow me to suggest LTC Dr. David Kilcullen’s work (also from Australia) Twenty-Eight Articles as well as his Countering Global Insurgency or purchasing a copy of the longer form of the piece (I will confess to reading only the internet version).

    I also highly recommend the Field Manual written by General Petreaus, which was greatly informed by Col. Kilcullen’s work, FM3-24 Counterinsurgency Manual

    The number of discussion topics on fighting Extremist Islamic Terrorism at Small Wars Journal are too numerous to list. One could literally spend years going through them, but they do provide a diversity of opinion that helps one come to a more complete and personal understanding of the true nature of the conflict.

    I also recommend the blog called The Captain’s Journal, as well as Global Security, Micheal Totten, and Micheal Yon all of whom bring their own unique perspective to the overall picture.

    But, you are also free to ignore any of the above. Its my understanding that in some circles I am regarded as being massively uninformed, sloppy in my research, have a nasty tone, and am prone to using ad hominem attacks if things don’t go my way in a discussion. I do find myself wondering why that should separate me from anyone else who posts on the internet, but there it is.

  45. 45
    Shannon says:

    43wb
    More importantly, why can’t I find Bluebell’s Tin Roof flavor on a regular basis?

  46. 46
    bob42 says:

    One of daughter’s pals dropped off a dozen small cupcakes earlier today. I had one for desert after lunch. It was delicious, but I should have known better after I took the first bite. The inside had a very slight green tint to it. I figured they were leftover from St. Patty’s day.

  47. 47
    mharper42 says:

    #45
    It’s seasonal. Here’s a BB timetable:
    http://www.bluebell.com/Templates/UI/FlavorFrame.aspx

    The last time I had their Tin Roof, I think they were putting mini-marshmallows in it. That’s just wrong.

  48. 48
    Shannon says:

    44 Sarge
    Thanks. Anecdotally, I have Marine friend who will brook no sweeping generalizations about Islam, and this even after losing some of his buddies when they fought in Fallujah.

  49. 49
    Sarge says:

    48 Shannon says:
    March 28, 2011 at 3:25 pm
    44 Sarge
    Thanks. Anecdotally, I have Marine friend who will brook no sweeping generalizations about Islam, and this even after losing some of his buddies when they fought in Fallujah.

    I have a stepson who served two tours in Iraq (both in Baghdad, one as Force Protection on convoys in the early stages—when it was most dangerous to be riding in an American truck)who has similar sentiment, as well as a former business parter who served one in Afghanistan at the very beginning and another in Iraq after the Surge. His is an Intelligence MOS. FWIW, I finds that the greater majority of those individuals I meet who have served in the Middle East from both the First and Second Gulf Wars feel pretty much the same way.

  50. 50
    Shannon says:

    Never saw marshmallows in Bluebell’s Tin Roof. But I did in another brand. As you say, downright nasty.

  51. 51
    Shannon says:

    All that being said, the bottom line for me is Muslim dominated states are, in the main, dominated by radicals/jihadiists right now. And the radicals are in asendency elsewhere. A lack of a clear, consistent drumbeat of outrage from “the invisible moderates” (that is if they even exist) is unforgiveable and highly suspicious. And they will make ZERO headway in Western opinion circles until they do.

  52. 52
    bob42 says:

    I wish y’all would quit talking about ice cream.

  53. 53
    Sarge says:

    51 Shannon says:
    March 28, 2011 at 4:03 pm
    All that being said, the bottom line for me is Muslim dominated states are, in the main, dominated by radicals/jihadiists right now. And the radicals are in asendency elsewhere. A lack of a clear, consistent drumbeat of outrage from “the invisible moderates” (that is if they even exist) is unforgiveable and highly suspicious. And they will make ZERO headway in Western opinion circles until they do.

    Given that most of those in question live under the control of bloodthirsty despots, I tend towards more forebearance towards the average man on the street than others seem to. In that atmosphere, even the polls taken are suspect as most answers given on official looking documents or to official looking canvassers are generally calculated towards keeping one’s head attached to one’s shoulders more than it is in giving an honest answer. I think that’s why the military men and women I have known who have been in direct personal contact with them come away feeling as they do.

  54. 54
    Katfish says:

    #51 –

    And the radicals are in ascendancy elsewhere. A lack of a clear, consistent drumbeat of outrage from “the invisible moderates” (that is if they even exist) is unforgivable and highly suspicious. And they will make ZERO headway in Western opinion circles until they do.

    Octuple MEGADITTOS! (no charge for the spelling corrections mon Ami)

  55. 55
    Katfish says:

    #53 – Anyone wonder where America might be (or not at all) if our founding Fathers operated based on the fear that King George wanted them obedient & thoroughly taxed or dead?

  56. 56
  57. 57
    Shannon says:

    Yeah, I saw the spelling problem. I try to catch ‘em.

  58. 58
    Shannon says:

    Sarge
    I’ll settle for 50,000 Detroit Muslims marching in the street.

  59. 59
    Shannon says:

    You know, there’s just something really uplifting about a cute middle aged brunette gassing up her new canary yellow Camaro.

  60. 60
    fat albert says:

    Sarge;

    Fascinating articles. I suspect that you are correct – Military sources are probably more reliable than civilian, especially in this area.

    One of the things I came away with is that Islam is quite factionalized and extremely diverse in its belief structure. And, you can probably derive any point of view you would like on any subject, just by citing the right verses and the right scholar.

    I have a hard enough time wading through the in’s and out’s of Christian Church history. I have absolutely no desire whatsoever to try to decipher which Islamic sect is which.

    I do find it interesting that even in areas where Muslims do not live in fear of their life there is an almost total lack of condemnation of many of the most egregious terririst activities.

  61. 61
    Sarge says:

    #53 – Anyone wonder where America might be (or not at all) if our founding Fathers operated based on the fear that King George wanted them obedient & thoroughly taxed or dead?

    About where these folks are now if the British Government hadn’t been run by a Parliament and their armed forces possessed air power, automatic weapons, armor, and mechanized infantry.

    Unless, of course, an International Coalition intervened and imposed a no-fly-zone and started blowing up British tanks.

  62. 62
    bob42 says:

    #59 Hmmm… “uplifting.”

    You know, there’s just something really uplifting about a cute middle aged brunette gassing up her new canary yellow Camaro.

    If I had more time, I could go places with that (figuratively and literally.)

  63. 63
    Sarge says:

    58 Shannon says:
    March 28, 2011 at 4:38 pm
    Sarge
    I’ll settle for 50,000 Detroit Muslims marching in the street.

    That might make us feel better, but as mharper has said, those are the ones that left those regions and old habits and attitudes die hard. I doubt that 50,000 muslims marching in Detroit would have much affect on what is done and decided overseas.

  64. 64
    Shannon says:

    Shoot Sarge,
    I’ll settle for a thousand FREE London Muslims in the street protesting against the actions of the jihadists. Or in France. Or any other damn country where they enjoy freedom of assembly.

  65. 65
    Shannon says:

    63
    That is kind of a weaselly response.

  66. 66
    wagonburner says:

    You know, there’s just something really uplifting about a cute middle aged brunette gassing up her new canary yellow Camaro.

    Down boy.

    Easy there fella.

  67. 67
    Shannon says:

    66wb
    I guess that was an unfortunate, yet innocent, poor choice of wording.

  68. 68
    Sarge says:

    I do find it interesting that even in areas where Muslims do not live in fear of their life there is an almost total lack of condemnation of many of the most egregious terririst activities.

    My connection went south for a bit.

    If you look at that first piece, there’s an intepretation given that suggests methods of acheiving that goal, and there are others.

    None of them recommend treating Islam as a monolithic faith, or that it is evil or immoral.

    My goal is doing what I can to get people to understand that in portraying Islam as such, they are actually endangering the lives of our troops, and contributing to a longer war.

  69. 69
    Shannon says:

    Let’s see…
    The Tea Party becomes a legimate force in 18 months.
    Twenty-eight years after 220 Marines are murdered in Beirut, moderate American Muslims are still trying to figure out how to get their message out.

  70. 70
    Sarge says:

    65 Shannon says:
    March 28, 2011 at 5:07 pm
    63
    That is kind of a weaselly response.

    Let me try again, and expand on my #68 at the same time.

    If you’re fighting a war, and waiting on the enemy to do something, you’re doing it wrong.

    If you’re fighting a war, and waiting on non-combatnats to do something, you’re doing it wrong.

    You have to examine what it is that YOU need to do to make things happen. its the only way you are going to control the outcome, as best as outcomes can be controlled.

    There’s a Leadership Principal that goes a bit towards helping to understand that concept.

    If you are Leading and those you lead do not accomplish what is desired, your first question should not be “How did they fail me?”. It should be “How did I fail them?”. Once you have asked that question and answered it honestly, you might be surprised how much better they perform the next time around.

  71. 71
    Shannon says:

    My goal is doing what I can to get people to understand that in portraying Islam as such, they are actually endangering the lives of our troops, and contributing to a longer war.

    A laudable goal. Choose your battles and tactics wisely.

    Modify Delete

  72. 72
    Sarge says:

    A laudable goal. Choose your battles wisely.

    Sometimes the battle chooses you.

    Some are worth fighting whatever the cost.

    For me, the way I understand it and the information I’ve gotten, this is one of them.

  73. 73
    Sarge says:

    Another thing I’ll add.

    There are people in this world who will fight battles with no where near the import of this one with a good deal more nastiness and zeal than what is actually at stake would require.

  74. 74
    mharper42 says:

    Sarge, with all the sensitivity and understanding you are showing for Islam, what do you have to say about the pi$$poor way almost all Muslim males treat the wimmins?

  75. 75
    Shannon says:

    I wonder if “moderate” American Muslim leadership sits around asking themselves how they might have failed their legions of followers.

  76. 76
    Shannon says:

    74 harp
    Knowing him as I do, I take Sarge at his word that his concern is our men on the battlefield. Characterizing his recent forays into Muslim understanding as you do overstates that which he is doing, IMHO.

    Im pretty certain he’s far from defending the general state female rights in Islamic culture.

    Dammit Sarge this is getting complicated.

  77. 77
    wagonburner says:

    wimmins

    :)

  78. 78
    wagonburner says:

    blah blah blah

    Coalition.

    blah blah blah

    Direct national interest.

    blah blah blah

    Qadaffi Khadafi Ghadafi Kadhaffi Big Mo must go.

    blah blah blah

  79. 79
    wagonburner says:

    Left unsaid was why we NEED to go into Libya, yet we couldn’t even offer a word of support to the Iranians who were dying like the Libyans. Why Libya and not Syria?

  80. 80
    Dooood says:

    A laudable goal. Choose your battles and tactics wisely.

    Modify Delete

    Geez. Which one do I choose…

  81. 81
    wagonburner says:

    I wondered how he would bring Bush into this.

    blah blah blah

    Iraq took eight years, thousands of lives, and lots of bux. We won’t repeat that.

  82. 82
    Shannon says:

    Okay folks. Here’s the deal.

    Sarge has taken what he deems as reliable information (that an American shift towards towards universal hatred of–or prejudice against–Islam in general is deleterious to our men and women in the battlefield) and is running with it.

    Has he embarked on a task of unbelievable dimension? You bet your ass he has.

    Good luck.

  83. 83
    Sarge says:

    74 mharper42 says:
    March 28, 2011 at 6:11 pm
    Sarge, with all the sensitivity and understanding you are showing for Islam, what do you have to say about the pi$$poor way almost all Muslim males treat the wimmins?

    Which Muslims?

    I’m not real happy with the way the Yearning for Zion folks treat their women, particularly the young ones. Hindu women don’t have is so good either, but they are improving at a much faster pace than even Western women did once they became an affluent nation. More than half the women in Peru are victims of domestic violence, I’m not happy about that. There are some isolated Eskimo tribes that have some weird customs when it comes to women, too. The Japanese are doing much better than they did before Hiroshima. Chinese women are restricted as to how many children they can have. Sierra Leone has a pretty bad record as does most of the post colonial African nations.

    Am I supposed to care only about the Muslim women and ignore all the others? Are we supposed to single them our for our shame and scorn? What happens when they notice we’re doing that?

    Dammit Sarge this is getting complicated.

    I thinkl Petreaus said it best when he took over in Iraq and addressed the troops:

    Hard doesn’t mean impossible.

  84. 84
    Sarge says:

    Left unsaid was why we NEED to go into Libya, yet we couldn’t even offer a word of support to the Iranians who were dying like the Libyans. Why Libya and not Syria?

    Like I said, its the Three Bears Policy.

    Syria doesn’t have any oil.

    Iran has too much.

    Libya is juuuuuust right.

    He can fight this until it reaches a stalemate and degenerates into a low intensity insurgency with no clear cut winner and no real prospect for a near term ending. This is gonna keep the price of oil artificially hign and without the political cost the Moratorium is bringing. Sorso won’t mind. The Europeans who pump the oil won’t mind. The greenies won’t mind. The folks trying to sell Electric weenie mobiles won’t mind. It helps everybody he cares about.

    If he tried it with Iran, the price of oil would go too high as the Iranians would close the Straits of Hormuz and bomb the Saudi fields, thus ruining any chance of re-election.

    And doing anything in Syria won’t do a damn thing to the price of oil.

  85. 85
    Darren says:

    #5;

    Many soccer moms in Texas can shoot the [posterior orifice] out of a rat at 50 yards with a .45.

    Better than sucking them out at point blank range.

  86. 86
    Darren says:

    fat albert #11;

    Newt’s running……..

    Obviously into a brick wall.

  87. 87
    Darren says:

    oletimer #15;

    Is that Bill’s escape jet for when Hillary comes home?

  88. 88
    Darren says:

    Super Dave;

    It could have been a TV the Burger King store bought a few years ago. From the televisions I’ve seen at Burger King, they are NOT $3,800 sets according to today’s set’s picture standards. Unless someone’s making a killer profit from the BK stores.

  89. 89
  90. 90
    Hamous says:

    Hammie, you might check gun sales since the last presidential election.

    I believe just the opposite.

    No doubt there’s been a spike in gun sales from “The Barry Effect”. But I think a large part of that can be attributed to gun owners like you and me buying more guns. I think the general trend has been for more people not to own guns thanks to unconstitutional bans in high population centers like DC and Chicago. I’ve noticed anecdotally that people not raised in houses with guns (Yankees moving down here) tend to be more in favor of gun control. We were brought up with guns in our houses (and no trigger locks) but were taught gun safety (if I had a nickel for every time my dad asked “Is your safety on?” I could retire). Their children have been taught to be pathologically afraid of guns, as if the guns themselves have a conscience and a will.

  91. 91
    Sarge says:

    89 wagonburner says:
    March 28, 2011 at 8:08 pm
    Australia. The Nocona, Texas of the former British Empire.

    When I was a much younger man, I had a collection of Nocona Boot posters. I beleive there were six in the series and I had all of them dry mounted and framed up on the walls of my apartment.

    This one was my favorite

    But this one wasn’t bad either.

    Dang.

    Wish I hadn’t found that one on Ebay——-

  92. 92
    El Gordo says:

    For those who may not know, Nocona is located on the Red River where the Chisholm trail led for fording. The cowboys would all have their feet measured and a pencil outline drawn then continue on their journey north. When they returned with a pocket full of money from selling the herd, their boots were ready to be picked up. That’s how it started.

    I saw an old pair of beat up boots in their storefront with a not attached complaining about their condition. It included a statement about how disappointed the owner was. He claimed to have walked to Montana and back 5 times in them, and look, they just didn’t hold up well at all. He did request a new pair though, and I think they accommodated him.

  93. 93
    GJT says:

    I don’t know why the Rebecca Black (Friday, Friday….) youtube video WB linked to yesterday is fascinating me, 62 million views now and still going about 3 comments per second. Over 1 million dislikes and only 135,000 likes, why are they watching it?

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